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Archive for November, 2011

Annual Economic Development Summit a “Declaration of Inspiration”

Tuesday, November 8th, 2011

Just as inspiration has led countless Granite State entrepreneurs to create products and services that are changing the world, the New Hampshire Division of Economic Development is hoping its annual gathering will spark the ideas that result in business formation.

Burns Development Group Principal Linda Burns

“The Declaration of Inspiration” is the theme of the 16th Annual New Hampshire Economic Development Summit to be held at Church Landing in Meredith on Tuesday, December 13th from 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m.

“Inspiration is what drives entrepreneurs to develop new ideas, attempt the impossible and stand tall in a highly competitive business environment,” said New Hampshire Division of Economic Development Interim Director Christopher Way. “It’s only fitting that we use our annual summit to recognize the great companies that are responsible for growing our economy while also opening the door for new prospective business owners to network with economic development practitioners and partner organizations.”

The keynote speaker for the event will be Burns Development Group Principal Linda Burns, a national site selector with over 30 years experience in corporate recruitment relocation and expansion strategies; economic development and workforce assessment, target marketing, government relations, and non-profit organizational planning.  She brings public sector insight to her consulting due to her years of partnering with the Dallas-Fort Worth region’s cities and the State to market and recruit major companies to Texas, including the corporate headquarters of AT&T, Comerica, Research in Motion/Blackberry, and Blockbuster. Burns will discuss how New Hampshire economic developers and businesses can work together to foster an environment that is attractive to site selectors looking to place clients interested in relocation or expansion.

In addition to the keynote address, there will be two interactive business panels offered. The “Leading the Pack – Inc. 5000” panel will feature a group of New Hampshire businesses including Rustic Crust and Dyn that were featured on this year’s Inc. 5000 list while the “Business Underground –  Rising to the Top” panel will feature a group of emerging companies including EARTHTEC, Animetrics and Tradeport USA that are known for their innovation and cutting edge technology. Other sessions will feature Glen Group Owner Nancy Clark who will discuss “How to Survive When Your Industry is Considered an Expense” and Epiphanies Inc. Co-Owner Allen Voivod who will present “Safety in Numbers: The Crowdsourcing of Inspiration.”

For the third consecutive year, Scott Spradling of the Spradling Group (www.spradlinggroup.com) will be the guest emcee. As a special touch, Melissa Koerner of Friend Your Body (www.friendyourbody.com) will kick off the day by getting attendees’ blood circulating and sharing a few tips for transforming health while “on the go.” Entertainment will be provided by local musician Jim Tyrrell (www.jimtyrrell.net) whose third full-length album “Onward to Yesterday” was released in 2010. The “Commissioner’s Awards for Economic Development Excellence” will also be presented.

Admission to the 16th Annual New Hampshire Economic Development Summit is free due to the generosity of event sponsor Public Service of New Hampshire. New Hampshire Business Review is the Summit’s media sponsor.

“Public Service of New Hampshire is once again happy to support this great conference which brings together businesses, economic developers and elected officials to help build our state’s economy,” said Public Service of New Hampshire Economic & Community Development Manager Pat McDermott. “All economic development starts with good ideas and I look forward to the networking, information sharing and exchange of views at this signature event.”

To register for the Summit, please email Catherine Goff at cgoff@dred.state.nh.us or call 271-2341.

Ask CJ: Landing Venture Capital Investment

Tuesday, November 8th, 2011

Q: “I just read about a business that has been funded by a venture capital firm.  What type of businesses do they invest in and how can I find one locally?”

A: Like angel investors, venture capital firms invest in businesses that have high growth potential.  They are also similar to angel investors as they provide equity financing and don’t recoup their investment until the company is sold or there is some other sort of exit opportunity such as an IPO or a merger.  Venture capital firms tend to make larger investments and often come in after angel financing.  This isn’t a hard and fast rule but it is a fairly common scenario.

NH Division of Economic Development Seacoast Business Services Specialist Christine J. Davis

I spoke with Jesse Devitte of Borealis Ventures which has an office in Portsmouth and will be celebrating 10 years of investing in entrepreneurs in February.  Jesse originally sat on the other side of the table when he sought venture capital when creating what was at the time Soft Desk which was later acquired and is now known as Auto Desk.  Along with his two partners, Jesse sees himself as a business builder and not simply someone who writes a check to a promising company.  During our conversation, very little was said about numbers and much was said about relationships.  Venture capitalists are investing in a person or team of people and there needs to be a solid relationship for the partnership to work.  He put it quite succinctly when he said, “Imagine your absolute worst week in business.  Would you want those people (the VC’s) to be in the room with you?”  You also want your investors to really understand your business as they will most likely have an active role in your company and you want your “thought partner” to provide advice that is based on relevant industry expertise.

Venture capitalists take on more risk than other types of financing so the reward for them will be higher than for a traditional bank loan.  The terms vary and it is critically important that the entrepreneur spends some time going over the details.  Hire a lawyer who has experience with equity investing and not simply general business law.  Jesse also recommended that the entrepreneur get familiar with the financing documents which can be found at the National Venture Capital Association website, www.nvca.org

It isn’t easy to get VC funding so be prepared to get a lot of rejections and don’t take it personally.  The average yield (percentage of applicants that get funded) is a mere 2%.  So, for every 100 proposals, just two of them will get the green light.  That doesn’t guarantee that those two will succeed either.  The hardest business to get funded is the one that has never been funded.  To improve your odds, make sure you are talking with firms that are interested in your industry.  Avoid cold calling the firm and find someone who can make an introduction for you.  Know your industry inside and out and don’t think for a minute that there aren’t any competitors.  There are.  Are your financial projections conservative?  Perhaps in your eyes, but it is doubtful others will see it that way so I would recommend you restrain yourself from telling them that.

Newforma, a Manchester company, was one of the companies that Borealis Ventures funded around seven years ago.  What started out as a team of six founders now boasts over 80 employees with about half of them working in Manchester.  Ian Howell, the CEO, agreed with Jesse that the relationship with the VC firm is incredibly important as they will be taking an active role in your company.  He agreed that getting funded is much easier if you have been previously funded.  Even having past successes it took Newforma five months to secure their series A funding.  They based their successful fundraising on having done their due diligence which included in depth client interviews and approaching the right investors.

I was amazed to learn that an entrepreneur is given 45 minutes to make their pitch and convince the VC to fund their business.  Even if you possess a great business plan, solid team and real commitment, you still could get rejected.  Timing and fit are incredibly important.  When meeting with one particular investor, the gentleman pushed back from the table, crossed his arms and told Ian he wasn’t interested.  Ian hadn’t even begun his pitch.  However, thanks to a strong business plan and thorough “storyboards” the investor completely changed his mind and offered the funding at the end of the meeting.  You never know.

When asked about his thoughts on current funding opportunities, Ian responded, “There is a lot of money looking for a good home.”  The bar may be set higher these days but if you have the right plan, team and strategy you just might find yourself sharing your success story with tomorrow’s entrepreneurs.

Whether you have been in business for 20 years or just getting started, we have the resources and the expertise to answer your questions. You can e-mail me at Christine.Davis@dred.state.nh.us. I look forward to hearing from you.

 Christine J. Davis works for the N.H. Division of Economic Development as a resource specialist serving businesses in Rockingham and Strafford counties. Her role is to provide the support needed for businesses so that they may remain viable and growing entities in the community. Ms. Davis lives in Exeter with her two daughters.  When not performing her work or parenting duties she can be found volunteering with her girls for the Chamber Children’s Fund, “hitting the gym,” or spending time with friends and family.

GCEDC Receives $225,000 Commission Grant to Build Business Incubator

Monday, November 7th, 2011

The partnership to develop a business incubator in Plymouth received a hearty boost upon the news that the Grafton County Economic Development Council (GCEDC) received $225,000 for construction purposes.  The grant, from the Northern Border Regional Commission, will be used to leverage federal funds that could complete the project by mid-2013.

GCEDC Executive Director Mark Scarano

Since 2010, the GCEDC has partnered with Plymouth State University and others to develop a business incubator in Plymouth.  The incubator, called the Enterprise Center at Plymouth, will provide support services to new and growing entrepreneurial companies from around central New Hampshire.  The services include networking with other companies and equity funders, mentoring, technical assistance, and, in many cases, leased space to launch businesses. 

As its role in the partnership, Plymouth State University will provide the services and staffing to assist the companies.  The GCEDC will be responsible for providing flexible space for companies as they grow.  Typically, incubators will provide space and assistance for up to thee years, or until a company is financially viable.

The Northern Border Regional Commission funds will be used to redevelop 149 Main Street, Plymouth.  Currently vacant, the building holds promise, because of its location and proximity to PSU’s Small Business Institute, to continually develop new innovative companies.  Thanks to the Commission’s funding, the GCEDC can now apply for federal funds that, if successful, will allow the organization to create a second floor on the one story structure.  

“We’re extremely pleased that the Northern Border Commission joins us in seeing the strong economic development potential in the Enterprise Center at Plymouth,” stated GCEDC Executive Director Mark Scarano.  “These funds were crucial in allowing us to move forward with the project.”

PSU President Sara Jayne Steen was also pleased to hear the news. “The partnership to develop the Enterprise Center at Plymouth is an important step for expanding PSU’s award winning entrepreneurial education capacity in the region.  PSU’s Small Business Institute has assisted hundreds of businesses over its 30 year history.  Now, thanks to our partnership with the GCEDC and support of the Northern Border Regional Commission, we are closer to being able to offer a real estate component to its services.”

The New Hampshire Department of Resources and Economic Development took an early lead in promoting the Enterprise Center at Plymouth project to the Commission.  “Governor Lynch strongly supports efforts to develop programs that support entrepreneurs as they start and grow,” stated DRED Commission George Bald. “I’m glad that we could play a part in helping this economic development project move forward to completion.”

Created by Congress in 2009, the Northern Border Regional Commission is a federal-state partnership that provides funding to economic development, transportation, infrastructure and conservation projects in the northeast’s northern forest region.

Common Man Restaurants Celebrate 40th Year With Donations

Monday, November 7th, 2011

The Common Man family of restaurants in New Hampshire marked its 40th year with a $40,000 birthday gift to the New Hampshire Food Bank and the unveiling of a DO GOOD charity raffle to assist 20 other non-profits in the state.

New Hampshire Governor John Lynch joins Common Man CEO Jason Lyon, Vice President Diane Downing and owner Alex Ray in presenting a $40,000 birthday gift to the New Hampshire Food Bank's Director of Development Colleen Cowette.

At a party held at the New Hampshire Food Bank in Manchester last Thursday, Common Man owner Alex Ray, Vice President Diane Downing and CEO Jason Lyon gathered staff, partners and non-profits to announce a month-long celebration of the hospitality family’s 40th year, which includes throwback menus, parties and charitable endeavors.

Lyon kicked off the party with the donation to the New Hampshire Food Bank. “While this was a gift to mark our 40th birthday, we do encourage and even challenge all businesses across New Hampshire to give what they can as well, so that no resident goes hungry,” said Lyon.

Bruce Wilson, Director of Operations for the New Hampshire Food Bank, said the donation solidifies a partnership with the Common Man family that has spanned several years, and thanked the Common Man for helping serve more than 130,000 people. “This will go a long way in filling our shelves so that we can help those in need in our state,” said Wilson.

Governor John Lynch commended Ray and the Common Man family for their contributions to the state and to others. “To me, the Common Man represents all that is good about organizations in New Hampshire,” said Lynch. “It’s obvious they have a real commitment to their communities. Everywhere I go, there’s the Common Man, there’s Alex, giving back to the community.”

Ray reflected on 40 years of doing business in New Hampshire and commented that he often gets calls about locations outside of the state that would be perfect for a new restaurant or hospitality endeavor.

“I love it here, I love New Hampshire. Period,” said Ray. “It’s not just the beauty of our geography, it’s the people, it’s the work ethic, positivity, and it’s just great. I want us to be New Hampshire’s restaurant.”

Ray thanked the more than 800 employees of the Common Man family and credited them for the company’s success. “I am so proud of our Common Man family, we have a very good tenure and that’s what makes it magic.”

Steve Boucher, Communications and Legislative Director for the NH Division of Economic Development, said The Common Man is a world-class company that provides excellent food and is a leader in vision and spirit. “It’s companies like The Common Man that consistently create new opportunities to add to the workforce, to initiate redevelopment and to add to the social fabric that makes this state great.”

Common Man VP Downing announced a charity DO GOOD raffle that partners 21 of New Hampshire’s non-profits with 21 Common Man locations. Raffle tickets will be sold for $1 each with all proceeds benefiting the partner organization, and the lucky raffle winner will receive a Common Man gift card for $197.10, to mark the company’s inception in 1971.

Lyon said the charities in the DO GOOD raffle contest can also earn an additional $400 Common Man gift card through a voting contest on the Common Man’s Facebook page. The non-profit with the highest votes at the end of the month will win. Votes can be cast in the voting app at www.facebook.com/thecommonmannh.

Other festivities and promotions planned for the 40th anniversary include a Happy Birthday Video Contest, where contestants can sing their own version of Happy Birthday, capture it on video and load it to an app on the Common Man’s Facebook page. The videos will go to a public vote and finalist videos will be shown in a Birthday Idol contest at the culmination of the month-long celebration at The Flying Monkey Movie House and Performance Center in Plymouth on December 2. The grand prize for the video contest is a $400 Common Man gift card, said Lyon.

Getting back to its roots, the Common Man restaurant in Ashland, the company’s flagship location, will be serving up a throwback menu at throwback prices from November 7-12. Information about all of the Common Man’s 40th anniversary events and specials can be found at thecman.com or on the company’s Facebook page at facebook.com/thecommonmannh.

Slattery Appointed to the CDBG Advisory Board

Monday, November 7th, 2011

The NH Community Development Finance Authority announces that Justin Slattery has been appointed to CDFA’s Community Development Block Grant Advisory Board. Slattery, a Business Resource Specialist with the state Department of Resources and Economic Development, will help approve New Hampshire grant requests for federal CDBG funds. 

NH Division of Economic Development Business Resource Specialist Justin Slattery

“We’re pleased to have someone of Justin’s caliber on the Advisory Board,” said CDFA Executive Director Kathy Bogle Shields. “Justin will bring his extensive experience in business and workforce investment to the board, which will help insure quality economic development projects are approved.” 

Last year, CDBG economic development grants in NH assisted 26 businesses, 133 microenterprises, created 304 jobs, and retained another 50 jobs. CDBG housing grants serviced 418 units, 127 which were elderly occupied.  Every CDBG dollar invested leveraged another $5.28 in private funds. 

“I’m honored to represent the NH Division of Economic Development on the CDBG Advisory Board,” said Slattery. “I’ve worked with many businesses in the state and I’ve seen firsthand how a Community Development Block Grant can lead to economic growth and job creation.” 

A Pelham native and a 2003 UNH graduate, Slattery has been with the New Hampshire Division of Economic Development since 2010. Before that he worked with NH Works/Workforce Investment Act, HireVision Staffing, and was Director of Citizen Services for Governor John Lynch. He and his wife Amy live in Goffstown. 

The CDBG Advisory Board approves $8-10 million in grants annually for housing/public facilities and economic development projects for NH municipalities and counties.  Community Development Block Grants are funded by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and administered in New Hampshire by the Community Development Finance Authority. 

CDBG has been hailed by the US Conference of Mayors and by the Council of State Community Development Agencies as “the Federal Government’s most successful domestic program.”

The Men in Black Take Over the Airwaves…

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2011

We’re from the government and we’re here to help you….honestly we are.

Last night, we unveiled a new series of ads that will be running for the next few months on WBIN. The whole premise of our “Men in Black” campaign is that appearances are deceiving and even though we may appear bureaucratic with the business apparel, we are a “roll up your sleeves and get work done” type of operation.

Just the same as this blog issued a “no bull” edict when we launched it back in 2009, we make the same pledge now with this new ad campaign – we take the economy very seriously and we’re always available to help your business no matter where you are in the growth cycle. So get the popcorn ready, gather the family and enjoy our new spots.

Special thanks to our friends at Public Service of New Hampshire for their sponsorship, to WBIN (especially Kathy Schubert and Aaron Hatin) for conducting such fun and professional shoots, to my partner in crime Allen Voivod from Epiphanies Inc. for  always being such a great creative sounding board and collaborator and to Jim Tyrrell (www.jimtyrrell.net) for playing a mean guitar!  

New Hampshire Community Loan Fund receives grant from Starbucks and Opportunity Finance Network’s “Create Jobs for USA” Fund

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2011

A New Hampshire community lender today received a $231,000 grant from the Create Jobs for USA Fund, a collaboration between Starbucks and Opportunity Finance Network (OFN). The money will help the New Hampshire Community Loan Fund (Community Loan Fund) create and sustain jobs in New Hampshire as part of a national campaign to support small, community businesses.

The Community Loan Fund is one of just 28 community development financial institutions (CDFIs) in the nation to win a grant in the inaugural funding round. The grant was made possible by a $5-million seed contribution from the Starbucks Foundation. The Fund expects to raise tens of millions of dollars more, according to a spokesman, and 100% of these donations will go to CDFIs to finance underserved community businesses, and to help create and sustain jobs in underserved communities

Starting yesterday, the Create Jobs for USA Fund is collecting donations at www.CreateJobsforUSA.org and at nearly 7,000 company-operated Starbucks across the country. CDFIs that are OFN members will compete for these funds on a rolling basis.

“Create Jobs for USA is making it possible for Americans who have $5 to share help people who don’t have $5 to spare by creating and retaining jobs in their communities,” explained Mark Pinsky, OFN’s President and CEO. “The Community Loan Fund received this grant because it has demonstrated that it will provide financing that is good for community businesses and good for communities.”

The Create Jobs for USA campaign will benefit business owners like Brad Sterl Jr., CEO of Rustic Crust in Pittsfield. Sterl, one of the business owners featured on the Create Jobs for USA Web site, needed financing to expand his business but was turned down by traditional lenders.

A $500,000 loan from the Community Loan Fund’s Vested for Growth team helped Sterl get his artisan-quality, natural and organic pizza products into more stores and create nearly 20 new jobs in a depressed and job-needy area of New Hampshire.

“We’re pleased that Starbucks recognizes the important work that CDFIs are doing, and honored that the Create Jobs for USA Fund has made a first-round grant to us,” said Community Loan Fund President Juliana Eades. “Create Jobs for USA is unprecedented for the CDFI industry. It is shining a national spotlight on our work and will help the Community Loan Fund get New Hampshire’s small businesses the financing they need create and sustain jobs.”

Community development financial institutions (CDFIs) provide financing to community businesses in underserved markets where would-be community business owners may not qualify for credit from traditional lending institutions. Community businesses include small businesses, microenterprises, nonprofit organizations, commercial real estate developers, and affordable housing developers. All of these community businesses help to create and sustain local jobs.

For information about the Community Loan Fund’s Small-Business Loans, please go to http://www.communityloanfund.org/businessloans. Businesses located outside of New Hampshire can find a local CDFI lender at http://opportunityfinance.net/findacdfi.

Take Steps to Keep Our Young Professionals in New Hampshire

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2011

If we aren’t already worried enough about the aging demographic in our state, perhaps we should be. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, New Hampshire is the fourth oldest state in the nation and is growing older at a rate that is higher than the national average.

These facts have ramifications both socially and economically. As older citizens leave the workforce, who will be there to take their place? How do you replace years of institutional knowledge.

That’s why I’m glad that organizations like Stay Work Play and postsecondary institutions like Antioch University are joining together to address the issue and try to stem the tide. Check out this release that just crossed my desk and please make plans to join the discussion on November 18th.

Take Steps to Keep Our Young Professionals in New Hampshire

Thousands of 25-35 year olds can’t find work in New Hampshire. They are smart, capable and eager to stay and work here, but they find it challenging to stay in our state.

Let’s talk about how to solve this urgent problem. Antioch University New England (AUNE) is hosting a statewide peer-to-peer strategy session during a free breakfast, 8:30 to 10:30 a.m., Friday, November 18.

The public is welcome. Join other people from around the state, including representatives from AUNE, New Hampshire Business for Social Responsibility, Stay Work Play, Keene Young Professionals of the Keene Chamber of Commerce, and AUNE’s Net Impact Chapter.

Kate Luczko, executive director of Stay Work Play-New Hampshire, will give a short keynote talk. Stay Work Play-NH <http://www.stayworkplay.org/>  is a nonprofit organization which furthers the goal of the 55% Initiative to encourage at least fifty-five percent of new graduates to stay in New Hampshire. Luczko was formerly program director for New Hampshire Businesses for Social Responsibility (NHBSR). <http://www.nhbsr.org/>

You’ll also be able to meet, Michelle Veasey, NHBSR’s new executive director, who will attend.

‘Catalysts for change’
Howard Schultz, CEO of Starbucks, wrote “…we must be catalysts for change in our own right and exercise our influence and responsibility as business leaders and entrepreneurs.” Schultz calls for a “peer to peer job strategy” that uses a collaborative approach to get people back to work. We want you to be part of this development strategy.

The goal is to identify concrete ways to keep our young professionals living and working in New Hampshire. We want to address this problem and invite you to be part of the solution. We expect our strategy session to come up with concrete action steps on:
• How universities can best prepare their students and young professionals to meet the needs of New Hampshire businesses and nonprofits.
• How nonprofits and businesses in the state can learn about the skills and talents New Hampshire graduates can offer, and create opportunities to hire them, even in tight financial times.
• How we can make sure that young professionals are part of the future of New Hampshire businesses and nonprofits.

8:15-8:30 a.m. Continental Breakfast served
8:30-9:00 a.m. Welcome and keynote speaker
9-10:30 a.m. Facilitated strategy-building conversation

The event is free and open to the public. It will be held in E101 at AUNE. Please RSVP to Stephanie Tickner, stickner@antioch.edu or call 603-283-2418.

The Little Bull That Could…

Tuesday, November 1st, 2011

The New Hampshire Division of Economic Development’s blog is an award-winning communications vehicle…..really…..no bull.

The Division’s “No Bull Business Blog” was recognized with an “excellent” rating in the 2011 Literature & Promotions Competition at the Northeastern Economic Developers Association (NEDA) 55th Annual Conference recently held at the Sheraton in Burlington, VT.

“We’re very excited that the blog has once again received a very favorable rating from our peers,” said New Hampshire Division of Economic Development Communications & Legislative Director Steve Boucher. “When we created the ‘No Bull Business Blog’ with our social media partners from Epiphanies, Inc., we set a goal of presenting business information in an interesting, entertaining, non-bureaucratic way. It’s gratifying to know that others in the economic development community feel that we’re hitting the mark.”

The Northeastern Economic Developers Association (NEDA) was formed in 1956 to promote economic and industrial development in the Northeastern region of the United States. The association encourages an informal exchange of ideas and serves as a medium by which its members can benefit from the experiences of other professionals.

To sign up for the No Bull Business Blog, visit http://blog.nheconomy.com/. The Division of Economic Development is also accessible at www.nheconomy.com http://www.facebook.com/NoBullBusiness and http://twitter.com/NoBullBlog.

9th Annual Governor’s Advanced Manufacturing and High Technology Summit to Focus on “Growth Through Collaboration”

Tuesday, November 1st, 2011

“Growth Through Collaboration” is the theme of the Ninth Annual Governor’s Advanced Manufacturing and High Technology Summit to be held Wednesday, December 7th from 7:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. at the Center of New Hampshire Radisson Hotel in Manchester. 

Lynn Tilton, Chief Executive Officer and Principal of Patriarch Partners, LLC will speak on “How to Save American Manufacturing” at the 9th Annual New Hampshire Advanced Manufacturing and High Technology Summit on December 7th at the Center of New Hampshire Radisson Hotel in Manchester.

The annual event is presented by the New Hampshire Division of Economic Development, the Business and Industry Association of New Hampshire, the New Hampshire Manufacturing Extension Partnership and the New Hampshire High Technology Council and will bring together state and national leaders of business and industry who, in thought-provoking presentations and workshops, will focus on how New Hampshire’s high tech and manufacturing industries can stimulate growth through collaboration. 

“Manufacturing and high tech sectors continue to be very important to New Hampshire’s economy,” Gov. John Lynch said. “We have a successful economic strategy in place here in New Hampshire that has allowed us to be a national economic leader. That is why it is important we continue to work together to ensure we are making the right investments as a state to strengthen our economy for the future.” 

Speakers at the summit will include Lynn Tilton, Chief Executive Officer and Principal of Patriarch Partners, LLC; economist Dennis Delay of the New Hampshire Center for Public Policy Studies; and Roger Kilmer, Director of Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP), a program of the U.S. Department of Commerce National Institute of Standards and Technology. Tilton, whose company bought and reopened the former Fraser Papers paper mill in Gorham in May as Gorham Paper and Tissue, will speak on “How To Save American Manufacturing;” while “Smart Manufacturing/High Technology – NH’s Leading Economic Sector” will be the subject of Delay’s address. Kilmer, the keynote speaker at the summit luncheon, will address “Becoming a Next Generation Manufacturer.”

Three one-hour workshops will be offered concurrently and presented twice during the morning session by a panel of industry experts: “Supply Chain Development and Collaboration,” “Developing the Future Workforce in NH Advanced Manufacturing” and “Technology-Driven Market Intelligence.” 

Sponsors for the event include Citizens Bank, BAE Systems, Chapter #327/Southern New Hampshire of the Society of Manufacturing Engineers, New Hampshire Business Review, the New Hampshire Department of Education, Southern New Hampshire Chapter #253 of the Association for Operations Management, TradePort USA and the New Hampshire Machining Association.

Cost for the summit is $95 per person. For more information, contact Zenagui Brahim at 603-226-3200 or email zenaguib@nhmep.org To register online, go to http://www.nhbia.org/CWT/External/WCPages/WCEvents/EventDetail.aspx?EventID=92. Phone registrations should be directed to Christine Ducharme at the Business & Industry Association of New Hampshire at 224-5388, ext. 113.