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Posts Tagged ‘business recruitment’

Trade Shows a Great Way to Bring New Hampshire to Decision Makers

Thursday, July 6th, 2017

Cindy Harrington is a business development manager for the NH Division of Economic Development.

New Hampshire Economic Development was able to tout its open for business sign last month to manufacturers and business owners from around the world at two trade shows – MD&M East in New York City, targeting medical device and manufacturing interests, and the SelectUSA Investment Summit in Washington, DC, focusing on foreign direct investment.

Joined by colleagues Michael Bergeron, senior business development manager, at MD&M and Tina Kasim, program manager at our Office of International Commerce, at SelectUSA, I met with scores of people at both trade shows keen on hearing our message about the state’s business friendly climate, educated workforce, robust industry sectors and quality of life. A great opportunity to not only answer their questions, but to ask some of our own, encourage a visit and follow-up with information they need, such as available real estate.

Trade shows are a dynamic, if not efficient, way, to meet and have conversations with business leaders who are considering business expansion or relocation.  Often, conversations plant the seeds for long term relationships for future growth opportunities. Followup is the key to our work at these events, keeping in touch with contacts so that when they are ready to further explore options, they will consider New Hampshire.

At MD&M, where we also met with attendees at simultaneous trade shows at the Javits Center for plastics, packaging and design manufacturing, some of the people with whom we spoke were focused on seeking manufacturers, suppliers and services contacts to develop relationships. Some were pleasantly surprised to see New Hampshire represented at the event and asked about our industry sectors.

At the SelectUSA show, we spoke with international investors and business owners exploring oportunities within the US, including locations for distribution and warehousing and investing in established companies, especially in the fields of bio-med and medical device manufacturing with an established workforce. We also met with foreign officials and consultants representing companies seeking to establish relationships with businesses in the US for distribution, investment and partnering.

Our message at these trade shows is New Hampshire’s business friendly climate. When we tell people we have no sales, personal income, estate, use, internet, capital gains or professional service taxes, they are surprised and intrigued – what we don’t have is definitely a conversation starter.

For others, it is our booth that draws them over to talk with us. Featuring a stunning lakeside image, it prompts people to take a time out from the busy show. They stare at the lake and share with us memories of going to camp here in the summer, family vacations and even business trips.

When decision makers can’t come to New Hampshire, trade shows  are a great way to bring New Hampshire to them.

 

 

Quebec Companies Learn About Benefits of Business Expansion to New Hampshire

Monday, October 10th, 2016

New Hampshire Economic Development at Montreal, 10/4/2016

The New Hampshire Division of Economic Development hosted more than two dozen representatives of Quebec-based businesses lastTuesday evening for a presentation in Montreal about the advantages of expanding their operations to the Granite State.

The dinner marked the first time in over four years the division has had funding to conduct a business recruitment event. In all, 27 executives from 19 companies representing aerospace and defense, transportation, IT, and other advanced manufacturing operations, attended.

“Quebec has always played a key role in New Hampshire’s economy, from our historic mills to our North Country,” said Jeffrey Rose, commissioner of the Department of Resources and Economic Development. “The benefits for Canadian companies, especially manufacturers, to consider expansion to New Hampshire are significant. From our shared border, business friendly climate and skilled workforce, the Granite State is a very favorable location.”

The presentation, conducted primarily in French by business resource specialist Beno Lamontagne, included testimonials by Marie-Josee Vaillant, president of KHEOPS International in Colebrook, and Benoit Frappier, president of Ben-Mor in Hinsdale, who have expanded their Quebec-based businesses to New Hampshire in recent years.

As a result of the presentation, two companies plan to visit northern New Hampshire in the near future to learn more.

“Business recruitment efforts play an important role in economic development,” Rose said. “Companies expanding or relocating to the state create – jobs, complement existing manufacturers who need their suppliers nearby and diversify our economy. We’re pleased that our budget now includes funding to conduct this kind of activity outside of New Hampshire.”

The state’s lack of sales, income, use, estate, inventory and capital gains taxes; examples of available commercial and industrial real estate and quality of life were highlighted during the presentation.

The Division of Economic Development, part of the New Hampshire Department for Resources and Economic Development, is the single point of contact for New Hampshire businesses needing assistance and resources to grow and thrive, as well as for out-of-state companies looking to expand or relocate in the state. For more information, visit nheconomy.com.

Lorna Colquhoun
Communications Director
Division of Economic Development

5 Questions with Michael Bergeron, Division of Economic Development Business Development Manager

Friday, April 1st, 2016

Michael Bergeron, senior business development manager

Every day, our business development managers, Michael Bergeron and Cynthia Harrington, speak with site selectors and business owners from around the country searching for the right place to expand or relocate their companies. Their reasons are varied – some may have a deep affinity for the Granite State, while others are drawn to our business friendly climate and educated workforce. Michael talks about the process involved in the expansion/relocation of a company.

1. Business recruitment is an important part of economic development, as it facilitates job creation, encourages growth and diversifies the New Hampshire economy. What’s a typical day like in the life of business development?

We are a sales office for the state, so the priority every day is increasing our pipeline of qualified leads and once we have a strong lead on an interested company, we work with it, confidentially helping the company locate or expand in the state. We market each region of the state differently, based on the region’s strength and assets.

Each part of the sales cycle requires different needs, ranging from cold calls, research, writing proposals comparing New Hampshire with other states, making presentations to decision makers, facilitating meetings with other agencies such as the governor’s office, the Department of Environmental Services and the Department of Transportation; working with the University System of New Hampshire; the NH Business Finance Authority, the NH Community Development Finance Authority; contacting municipal officials; providing real estate tours and working on any issues that the company needs help with in ultimately choosing New Hampshire in which to expand or relocate.

We also work closely with local and regional economic development groups that are important in closing the sale. For example, I recently referred a company from Massachusetts to Jack Donovan of the NH Business Finance Authority, who was able to turn around an industrial bond loan within 40 days—a critical factor in landing the company in Hudson.

2. You’ve been a part of hundreds of business relocations and expansions in your tenure here at the Division of Economic Development. What is is about New Hampshire that draws companies here?

Currently in this market, the number one issue is the availability of skilled employees, followed by cost of occupancy and available office or industrial real estate. If any one one of these factors are missing, the transaction dies. If the company is a family-owned business, the decision is often affected by where its president lives, or wants to live.

And that decision by the owner, and his/her spouse, is predicated on a region with excellent schools, low crime, quality healthcare, cultural options, open space, easy access to major metro areas. Sometimes I have seen decision makers expand to New Hampshire because they have a summer home here.

If it’s a large national company looking for a branch location, then management wants to be close to Boston or Quebec and be confident it can hire managers, and lower the cost of occupancy, compared to the higher rents in the Boston market.

3. Earlier this year, the division unveiled its strategic plan, which identified a number of key industries. How is this helping business development?

The key industries’ clusters in New Hampshire can help attract similar companies that want to be part of the same cluster. For example, we have a growing aerospace cluster and bio/medical device cluster in New Hampshire. When we are on the road at trade shows, we show decision makers where these clusters are located, talk about the educational system that supports these clusters, and how we can help them locate employees and real estate. We understand the kinds of buildings needed for these uses and we can show where to find a good match for employees.

4. NH Economy is back on the road and will attend several trade shows this year. Can you tell us why it’s important to have a presence at them?

It is a myth that attending trade show provides instant leads; rather, it is a higher form of advertising, where we meet people face to face and develop business relationships over time. Finding the right venues and consistently attending is the key obtaining qualified leads. For example, I may meet site consultants at a show, but I may not work with them for another five years, after I develop trust and when an opportunity arises, they think of New Hampshire.

5. You speak with hundreds of companies every year that are considering relocation or expansion. Why is New Hampshire on their list of possibilities?

If they are companies from Massachusetts, Maine, or Vermont, they are looking to retain their current labor force in those states, and also find new employees, by staying within 30 to 50 miles of their current locations. If they are from outside New England, they are looking at New Hampshire because of our lower taxes, skilled work force, easy access to interstate highways and regional and international airports, and business friendly climate.

If it’s a large company, incentives are usually part of the evaluation. In these circumstances, New Hampshire competes with states like South Carolina, Texas, and Florida.

On a Mission

Thursday, April 19th, 2012

Our name – the Division of Economic Development – is also our mission. We work with businesses across the state, helping them grow, expand, adjust, innovate and prosper.

Idea Exchange

 

 We could not do our job without the wisdom, experience, insight and guidance of our Economic Development Advisory Council. Established some years ago, the council assists us in planning and measuring our efforts. With 22 members from across all sectors of business and industry, their counsel is invaluable.

 The quarterly EDAC meeting was held this morning. Attendance was robust and so were the reports from our membership. The consensus is that while the New Hampshire economy was not without some hardships in the recession, it weathered the challenges of the past few years much better than other states.

 We apprised our council of what’s happening in our division and frankly, it’s exciting. Business recruitment and retention efforts are paying dividends. Our Office of International Commerce is reaching out around the globe for opportunities for New Hampshire companies. New ways to use social media, this blog and even the old fashioned methods of dissemination are spreading the word about the good things that are happening in the New Hampshire economy.

 As sure as the purple lilacs will bloom in another couple of weeks, so is the Granite State economy.