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Posts Tagged ‘government contracting’

If You Think You Don’t, You Probably Do … Have a Product the Government Wants to Buy

Thursday, May 4th, 2017

Jane Brezosky ~ NH Government Contracting Assistance Center

The government marketplace presents contracting opportunities to all kinds of businesses because it buys more than just ball bearings, weapons systems and engineering services. In fact, there is great variety in the products and services federal, state and local governments need.

We recently assisted a small New Hampshire business respond to a RFP from the National Park Service for a replica of a 21-foot long braided woolen rug for the Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial in Lincoln City, Ind.

How unique – and how interesting – that a small New Hampshire company is able and well-qualified to bid on such an unusual contract.

Luckily, the business heard about this opportunity by word of mouth, but small businesses can’t count on luck to grow.

This is why you need to take a few moments and connect with us. You never know what the government is looking to buy and you may well be eminently qualified to do the job or provide the service.


Connect with the New Hampshire Government Contracting Assistance Center.


When you sign up for our client services, you will receive notifications of bid opportunities. You don’t go it alone after that. My colleagues and I provide free assistance to you to help you bid on, and win, a contract.

Our clients sell an array of products to federal, state and local governments, from firewood to flooring to furniture and much more.

I’ll bet your product or service would fit into a government market. Give us a call today.

Jane Brezosky

NH Government Contracting Assistance Center

It’s Small Business Week! Our Team Offers Advice to Grow and Thrive

Monday, May 1st, 2017

Happy Small Business Week! We’re celebrating because small businesses – all 132,432 of them in New Hampshire, according to the Small Business Administration – are the fuel that drives our economy.

The success of businesses, both large and small, drives our team here at New Hampshire Economic Development as well, and in honor of Small Business Week, we offer the best business advice to keep you fired up.

Chris Way
Deputy Director
Stay focused on the reason you started the business and don’t be tempted to pursue too much, too quickly.

Carol Miller
Director of Broadband Technology
There are two ways to be in the broadband business, proactive or catching up. Proactive makes it the best business experience.

Lorna Colquhoun
Communications Director
The most valuable commodity you have as a business owner is your story – the story behind your business. Who inspired you to start? What drives you? What is your mission? Your story is unique to you. It will make you stand out from your competitors and relatable to your customers and clients. Make the time to tell it.

Bridget Beckwith
Tax Credit Administrator
Your work doesn’t stop when you open your business, especially if you offer a service like accounting. It is important to stay on top of best practices, regulations and any training that pertains to what you do. This keeps you competitive.


Business Retention – Connect with our business retention team for help and advice on keeping your small business growing and thriving. 


Deborah Avery
Business Resource Specialist
Excellent customer service is a must! Keep in touch with your banker on a regular basis and make sure that you retain an outstanding insurance broker, accountant and attorney.

Mollie Kaylor
Business Resource Specialist
Don’t be afraid to seek help when you need it – there are many great programs and resources available to help your business succeed and grow! Take advantage of them.

Mark Laliberte
Business Resource Specialist
Make sure all of the preliminary work is done before taking that step. Issues like whether you have the financial ability to do this; can you commit the time necessary; and do you have an idea on what your business plan will look like. A great resource to address this preliminary work is to check out the SCORE website and then reach out to a counselor.


New Hampshire Government Contracting Assistance Center – Connect with the team that can help you identify, bid on, and win government contracts.


Dave Pease
Program Manager
Government Contracting Assistance Center
On a per capita basis, New Hampshire small businesses are government contracting powerhouses. With over $679 million in small business sales to the federal government in FY 2016 ($511.88 per capita), New Hampshire ranks #7 in the US and #1 in the Northeast!

Amanda Duquette
Contracting Assistance Specialist
When starting to sell to the government, start small – choose one agency you know will benefit from your product/service.  You don’t want to take too broad of an approach in the beginning because you can lose focus and end up feeling overwhelmed and even defeated.

Jane Brezosky
Contracting Assistance Specialist
The government marketplace presents contracting opportunities to all kinds of businesses. There is great variety in the products and services that are sold to the government. Your product or services might have a government market, too.


Business Development – Connect with the team that helps businesses looking to expand or relocate to the Granite State.


Cindy Harrington
Business Development Manager
For start-ups, make sure there is a strong market for the product or service. Develop a short term and long term plan. Working with Small Business Development Center or SCORE can assist with strategic planning and preparing for financing. Networking is important.

Michael Bergeron
Business Development Manager
Stick with what you know best and don’t pretend to be someone you are not. If you are a software expert, don’t pretend to be an accountant – hire a good one.


Office of International Commerce – Connect with the team that helps your business connect with global markets.


Tina Kasim
Program Manager
Don’t be afraid to look at international markets; they can offer incredible opportunities for your business, but you need to plan properly.

Nathaniel Nelson
International Trade Officer
Never feel that you have to navigate the world of business alone. There are plenty of resources out there to help you map out your success.

Rachel Adams
International Trade Officer
International trade is a valuable way to support your overall strategy. It does not happen overnight – it takes time and patience, but it will be worth it in the end.

 

 

NH Business Matters on Air: Government Contracting Opportunities

Thursday, February 18th, 2016
WTPL2-18

NH Economic Development Director Carmen Lorentz and Dave Pease, program manager, NH Government Contracting Assistance Center

Every month, our director, Carmen Lorentz, takes the reins of New Hampshire Business Matters on the airwaves at WTPL-FM 107.7 to talk about programs, trends and other things happening that are of benefit to our businesses.

Yesterday, Dave Pease was her guest. He’s the program manager for our Government Contracting Assistance Center and talked about the program, how it can help businesses bid on, and win, government contracts and an upcoming opportunity that can help them get started.

Why, yes, we do have a copy of the show for you to download right here. After you listen to it, you can get more information on our website right here.

Lorna Colquhoun
Communications Director
Division of Economic Development

Government Contracting is the New Name for NH PTAP

Friday, January 22nd, 2016

GovernmentContracting logo_rgb[1]

New Name, Same Agency

The name was a mouthful – New Hampshire Procurement Technical Assistance Program.

You may have known it in its abbreviated form: NH PTAP. And if you didn’t know what ‘procurement technical assistance’ meant and were afraid to ask, fear no more.

NH PTAP has always been about government contracting and helping New Hampshire businesses navigate the process to bring Uncle Sam on board as a customer. The name, though, sort of said that, but it didn’t.

So, as of Jan. 1., we’ve changed our name to the NH Government Contracting Assistance Center. The new name gets straight to the work of our agency.

Only the name has changed. Our services are still free to New Hampshire businesses and the same award winning staff is ready to help you bid on – and win – contracts from the federal government.

We’ll call ourselves ‘government contracting’ for short — no abbreviation.

The alphabet is happy to get some of its letters back and we’re happy that our new name leaves no one guessing what we do.

Dave Pease
Program Manager
NH Government Contract Assistance Center

Small Business Matchmaker was a Great Day for Hundreds of Companies

Tuesday, December 8th, 2015

The 2015 Small Business Matchmaker was a huge success, with over 200 people taking full advantage of the opportunity to speak with representatives of 26 prime contractors. Adding Uncle Sam to their list of clients is a great advantage for these small businesses.

One of the big messages from Primes, like BAE Systems? We want to work with more New Hampshire businesses.

Get started with our Procurement and Technical Assistance Program.

 

Matchmaker

5 Questions with Amanda Duquette, NH PTAP

Friday, June 19th, 2015

We’ve covered some of the higher-level facets of federal government contracting in previous “5 Questions” interview pieces, and this time, we decided to dig a little deeper into the space – looking at state and local opportunities, and what it’s like for a company to actually work with a procurement service.

To guide us in this area, we interviewed Amanda Duquette, procurement specialist with the New Hampshire Procurement Technical Assistance Program (NH-PTAP). Her day-to-day work includes one-on-one counseling with New Hampshire businesses selling their products or services, either directly to the local, state, and federal government or indirectly through subcontracting, as well as performing marketing research and creating strategic plans for companies to get the training and technical assistance they need to come up to speed for government contracting opportunities.

1. You’ve been with PTAP since 2007 and have worked with many, many businesses. How vital would you say PTAP’s services are to the overall success of those companies?

Amanda Duquette

Amanda Duquette

Most of the clients that we help come to us because they aren’t sure how to best pursue government contracts.  There are many registrations and processes that need to be completed before a company can be awarded a government contract.  We help companies navigate through the red tape and we basically walk them through the entire process.  There are many rules and regulations that go along with contracting with the government – and they are constantly changing. I think PTAP’s services are vital to companies who want to successfully work for the government.

2. What kinds of assistance are requested most often by New Hampshire businesses?

Many of our clients are new to the government contracting arena.  They are looking for assistance with government registrations and how to find government contracts that are a good fit for their company.  They want us to teach them how to set their business up to work for the government and then how to find and pursue government work.

3. Much of the PTAP talk is about federal contracts, but you help with state and local contracts, too. Can you give us a sense of the variety of products and services needed at state and local levels?

There is a vast variety of products and services that are needed at the state and local level.  There is usually a need for janitorial services, landscaping/snow plowing, construction/renovation work and automotive equipment. We also see needs for medical and professional services, laboratory equipment and hardware. Our Bidmatch service helps our clients get easy access to bidding opportunities that are found on the state and individual city and town websites, or published in the newspapers.

4. What kind of market research will you perform for clients interested in exploring contracting opportunities?

PTAP counselors do a lot of market research for our clients.  We often have clients who want to know if the government is buying their products or services. We take our clients on virtual tours to show them what agencies are buying their products or services. We can show them who their competitors are and what they are selling to the government and we can also show them competitor’s prices and sales amounts. We also teach our clients how to search for government contracts. If our client isn’t ready for direct government contracts, we show them how to find subcontracting opportunities.

5. Sometimes your clients aren’t quite qualified or otherwise capable of contracting with the government. What does PTAP do to help train or otherwise help these companies get to the point of being a suitable contractor?

You are right, not every company that comes to us is ready for government contracting. When we first speak with a new client, we assess his/her company – taking into consideration, its products/services, time in business, past performance and commercial market. We often recommend that companies that are not ready for direct government work reach out to prime contractors, to become a subcontractor for a piece of the project or work.  This helps them get their feet wet with government work and helps them understand what it takes to complete a government contract.  Also, when a company is a new start-up or not ready for our services, we usually refer them to our partners at the Small Business Development Center (SBDC) and/or SCORE.

Uncle Sam Wants Your Products and Services – Yes, *Your* Products and Services

Wednesday, April 8th, 2015

The US government is the world’s largest buyer of goods and services and last year, New Hampshire manufacturers and service providers met its needs to the tune of $1.7 billion.

Uncle Sam is a valuable client for any company, but it takes some patience and finesse to land a federal contract.

That’s why the upcoming DOD Northeast Regional Council Matchmaker event May 6-8 in Manchester, Vt., is an opportunity of which New Hampshire businesses should plan to take advantage.

“The government needs just about everything an ordinary business needs, from office furniture to food and clothing to specialized defense systems,” said Dave Pease, program manager for the New Hampshire Procurement Technical Assistance Program, part of the state’s Division of Economic Development. “The catch is that landing a federal contract, while beneficial to any business, is not easy. The process has to be fair and it has to be transparent.”

Next month’s matchmaker is the second of three being held in the northeast this year; Portland, Maine will be the site of the third one on Aug. 7. Matchmaker events draw scores of prime contractors; for example, BAE Systems, Albany Engineered Composites and Crane and Co., are expected to be among the primes on hand in May, ready to meet with representatives from more than 400 small businesses.

“New Hampshire small businesses are the government contracting champs of northern New England,” Pease said. “The key is having the best of something the government needs, not the size of the business.”

What do New Hampshire companies have that the government wants?

Gentex, in Manchester, produces microphones used in helmet systems for the military. C3I, Inc., of Hampton, specializes in aircraft lighting for US Navy ships. Winchester Precision Tech, of Winchester, works with the Los Alamos National Laboratory to learn more about dark matter. Mission Information Resources in Lancaster designs field notebooks for US Special Forces.

Pease notes that government contracting in New Hampshire is more than high tech and military. The process extends into places like the White Mountain National Forest, where everything from bundled wood for campgrounds to road repairs is needed.

In preparation for the federal matchmaker events, workshops will be held around the state to help businesses prepare for them.

Making the Most of the Matchmaker will be held from 9 – 11:30 am, April 16 at Manchester Community College and from 9:30 am to noon, April 20 at River Valley Community College in Keene.

One of the most important pieces of marketing for selling to the government is a capabilities statement. Capabilities Statement Coaching will be held from 9 to 11:30 am on April 29 at Manchester Community College.

For more information on the matchmaker, and government contracting, visit our website or  call NH PTAP at 271-7581; to register, visit http://www.us-ipe.org

Lorna Colquhoun
Communications Director
NH Division of Economic Development

Five Questions with Dave Pease, NH PTAP Program Manager

Friday, February 20th, 2015

(Welcome to our newest feature, Five Questions. Every week, nheconomy.com will introduce you to some of the most interesting and business-savvy people in New Hampshire, all within five questions. Ed.)

 

Selling to the government, whether at the federal, state, or local levels, can be a daunting challenge for businesses to pursue. It can also be a tremendous opportunity, with nearly half a trillion dollars waiting to be spent on products and services – some of which might surprise you.Print

To learn more about selling to government agencies, we talked to David Pease, program manager for the Procurement Technical Assistance Program. PTAP is a cooperative program of the U.S. Defense Department’s Defense Logistics Agency and the New Hampshire Division of Economic Development. NH-PTAP’s sole purpose is to help New Hampshire businesses win contracts and subcontracts with a wide variety of government agencies.

 

What do the opportunities for contracting with the federal government look like in 2015?

Sequestration and the winding down of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have reduced government spending, so government contracting opportunities have become more competitive over the past few years. That said, it’s still an enormous market.

Federal contracting budgets peaked at $539 billion in 2011 and have declined steadily to $445 billion in 2014, a reduction of about 7 percent per year. We expect this to level off, unless Congress allows sequestration to continue, in which case the decline will continue and possibly accelerate.

Defense contracts are experiencing a shift from expenditures to support ‘boots on the ground’ to more strategic systems – ships, subs and aircraft systems. Drone-related expenditures remain high and are likely to continue to do so.

 
What business industries in New Hampshire have the best chances of landing a federal contract?

The federal government is always seeking the most effective goods and services at the lowest price consistent with high quality. New Hampshire companies that have excellent products, and are ‘lean and mean’ enough to provide them at highly competitive prices will continue to see good opportunities in the federal markets.

Many New Hampshire high-tech manufacturers have been, and will continue to be, successful bidders for federal contracts and subcontracts. In the wake of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA, or commonly, ‘the Stimulus’), many New Hampshire construction contractors geared up for federal contracts, and have had increasing success carving out market share that they are likely to hold on to going forward.

We also have some outstanding specialty companies that will continue to see opportunities for their products and services.

 
What industries or types of companies would people be surprised to learn have received federal contracts with the help of PTAP?

The list is almost endless – juvenile furniture (cribs for Army daycare centers), off-road race driver training (for special operations troops) and investigation services (for the Department of Justice), to name just a few.

 
According to the SBA, “most of New Hampshire’s small businesses are very small, as 76.8 percent of all businesses have no employees, and most employers have fewer than 20 employees.” Are there opportunities for companies as small as these to bid for and win federal contracts?

Depending, of course, on the nature of the business, absolutely there are opportunities for the smallest of small businesses. Quite a number of our small machine shops, for example, make parts for military systems.

There are numerous small (but significant) contracts for landscaping, all of the construction trades, training services, security services, technical experts, food products, specialty garments – the list goes on and on.

 
What are the first steps business owners would have to take, if they’ve never done it before, to be able to bid for a federal contract?

We recommend that they become an NH-PTAP client. We provide free consulting and training to help New Hampshire businesses succeed with government contracting.

We usually start with an evaluation to understand the nature of the government markets for the company’s products or services. If the market appears to be attractive, then the company needs to determine what it needs to do to be ready to do business with Uncle Sam.

The legendary “red tape” is real, but NH-PTAP provides expert help getting through it, not just to winning a contract, but also through all of the requirements to comply with the government’s rules, along the way to successful completion and payment.
PTAP’s next training session is on Feb. 26, covering Federal Website Navigation III in Claremont. It’s a workshop where you’ll learn about the advanced tools available in the Federal Procurement Data System (FPDS-NG). FPDS is the repository of historical federal procurement data and can be used to better understand Federal customers’ buying patterns and structure. It also offers an opportunity to research and monitor the Federal sales of competitors and potential team members. Used effectively, FPDS can be a powerful market research tool. For more details, prerequisites, and to register for free, click here. For a list of all upcoming PTAP training events, click here.