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Posts Tagged ‘international trade’

It’s Small Business Week! Our Team Offers Advice to Grow and Thrive

Monday, May 1st, 2017

Happy Small Business Week! We’re celebrating because small businesses – all 132,432 of them in New Hampshire, according to the Small Business Administration – are the fuel that drives our economy.

The success of businesses, both large and small, drives our team here at New Hampshire Economic Development as well, and in honor of Small Business Week, we offer the best business advice to keep you fired up.

Chris Way
Deputy Director
Stay focused on the reason you started the business and don’t be tempted to pursue too much, too quickly.

Carol Miller
Director of Broadband Technology
There are two ways to be in the broadband business, proactive or catching up. Proactive makes it the best business experience.

Lorna Colquhoun
Communications Director
The most valuable commodity you have as a business owner is your story – the story behind your business. Who inspired you to start? What drives you? What is your mission? Your story is unique to you. It will make you stand out from your competitors and relatable to your customers and clients. Make the time to tell it.

Bridget Beckwith
Tax Credit Administrator
Your work doesn’t stop when you open your business, especially if you offer a service like accounting. It is important to stay on top of best practices, regulations and any training that pertains to what you do. This keeps you competitive.


Business Retention – Connect with our business retention team for help and advice on keeping your small business growing and thriving. 


Deborah Avery
Business Resource Specialist
Excellent customer service is a must! Keep in touch with your banker on a regular basis and make sure that you retain an outstanding insurance broker, accountant and attorney.

Mollie Kaylor
Business Resource Specialist
Don’t be afraid to seek help when you need it – there are many great programs and resources available to help your business succeed and grow! Take advantage of them.

Mark Laliberte
Business Resource Specialist
Make sure all of the preliminary work is done before taking that step. Issues like whether you have the financial ability to do this; can you commit the time necessary; and do you have an idea on what your business plan will look like. A great resource to address this preliminary work is to check out the SCORE website and then reach out to a counselor.


New Hampshire Government Contracting Assistance Center – Connect with the team that can help you identify, bid on, and win government contracts.


Dave Pease
Program Manager
Government Contracting Assistance Center
On a per capita basis, New Hampshire small businesses are government contracting powerhouses. With over $679 million in small business sales to the federal government in FY 2016 ($511.88 per capita), New Hampshire ranks #7 in the US and #1 in the Northeast!

Amanda Duquette
Contracting Assistance Specialist
When starting to sell to the government, start small – choose one agency you know will benefit from your product/service.  You don’t want to take too broad of an approach in the beginning because you can lose focus and end up feeling overwhelmed and even defeated.

Jane Brezosky
Contracting Assistance Specialist
The government marketplace presents contracting opportunities to all kinds of businesses. There is great variety in the products and services that are sold to the government. Your product or services might have a government market, too.


Business Development – Connect with the team that helps businesses looking to expand or relocate to the Granite State.


Cindy Harrington
Business Development Manager
For start-ups, make sure there is a strong market for the product or service. Develop a short term and long term plan. Working with Small Business Development Center or SCORE can assist with strategic planning and preparing for financing. Networking is important.

Michael Bergeron
Business Development Manager
Stick with what you know best and don’t pretend to be someone you are not. If you are a software expert, don’t pretend to be an accountant – hire a good one.


Office of International Commerce – Connect with the team that helps your business connect with global markets.


Tina Kasim
Program Manager
Don’t be afraid to look at international markets; they can offer incredible opportunities for your business, but you need to plan properly.

Nathaniel Nelson
International Trade Officer
Never feel that you have to navigate the world of business alone. There are plenty of resources out there to help you map out your success.

Rachel Adams
International Trade Officer
International trade is a valuable way to support your overall strategy. It does not happen overnight – it takes time and patience, but it will be worth it in the end.

 

 

Join Dyn Pro for Webinar about International Cyber Threats and How NH Businesses Can Protect Themselves

Monday, February 13th, 2017

Cyber crimes can strike any business, at any time, at any place in the world, including New Hampshire.

A webinar from 11:30 am to 12:30 pm, on Feb. 22 tackles the topic and is especially of interest to businesses involved in international e-commerce. Cybersecurity and Fraud Prevention will be led by Chris Brenton, senior director of information systems at Dyn in Manchester. Brenton has extensive experience in the computer security industry and is credited with uncovering numerous security vulnerabilities.


International Trade Officer Rachel Adams talks about programs to help launch New Hampshire businesses into global markets.


It is sponsored by the New Hampshire Office of International Commerce; U.S. Commercial Services; the Granite State District Export and Provident Bank.

The webinar will cover a range of topics, including security precautions companies can take on their websites to protect against fraudulent transactions; red flags of which to be aware when conducting e-commerce sales and safeguards to protect assets in the event of a compromising transaction.

The cost for the webinar is $25. For more information, contact Rachel Adams at the Office of International Commerce, 603-271-8444 or register here.

The Office of International Commerce, within the Division of Economic Development, part of the New Hampshire Department for Resources and Economic Development, is the single point of contact for New Hampshire businesses needing assistance and resources to grow and thrive, as well as for out-of-state companies looking to expand or relocate in the state.

For more information, visit nhEconomy.com or call 603-271-2341.

Globalization and New Hampshire: Survey Looks at Contribution of International Trade to NH Economy

Wednesday, November 16th, 2016
psu

Dr. Roxana Wright , Dr. Chen Wu ~ Plymouth State University

New Hampshire companies looking for new business suppliers and international partnerships, as well as companies aiming to understand their contribution to the state economy, will be interested in a new globalization study underway at Plymouth State University, in collaboration with the New Hampshire Department of Resources and Economic Development.

We have created the project New Hampshire Economic Globalization Report: Contributions and Opportunities for the Local Economy, which will use data on international trade transactions and direct investment from foreign companies to map the distribution of foreign direct investments (FDI) and international trade within the state and across counties. This information will enable us to explore the impact FDI and trade flows have on the economy across counties and industries, and the performance of domestic and foreign subsidiaries.


Take the survey here.


This study is important because it provides valuable information that can help shape state policy and assist exporters and importers in identifying markets. This study includes a survey, in which we encourage business owners and executives to participate.

Encouraging globalization is good for the New Hampshire economy, as 43,400 people were employed by 456 foreign subsidiaries, and trade supported 183,900 (or 22 percent of) New Hampshire jobs in 2014. The importance of these investigations is far reaching in terms of state policy, such as serving the needs of New Hampshire exporters and stimulating trade and FDI as a means for economic development, income growth and improving our business climate.

The analysis will result in measurement and prediction of contributions that FDI and trade bring to the local economies in terms of employment, investment promotion, exports facilitation, labor conditions, technology/know-how spillovers and social welfare. This FDI mapping is meaningful to policy makers who intend to support the development of certain locations/counties or of particular industries and provides key information to foreign companies looking to establish operations in New Hampshire.

We highly appreciate your participation in the survey. Should you have any question about the survey, please contact Dr. Chen Wu at  or Dr. Roxana Wright.

 

NH International Trade Office Earns Prestigious Export Award in Washington, DC

Monday, May 16th, 2016

The New Hampshire Office of International Commerce received a presidential E Award for Export Service this morning at a ceremony in Washington, DC.

Tina Kasim and Nathaniel Nelson receive the E Award from Secretary Pritzker

“The State of New Hampshire has demonstrated a sustained commitment to export Expansion,” said Penny Pritzker, U.S. Secretary of Commerce. “The E Awards Committee was very impressed with the State’s dedication to helping companies understand the intricacies of the export process. Its collaboration with partners to achieve export promotion goals was also particularly notable and its achievements have undoubtedly contributed to national export expansion efforts that support the U.S. economy and create American jobs.”

The Office of International Commerce, part of the New Hampshire Division of Economic Development, works with companies from around the state to help them introduce their products to global markets and to increase sales for veteran exporters.

Corfin Industries of Salem also received an E award at this morning’s ceremony.

“Recognizing the value of exports to our businesses and to the economy, we have worked hard over recent years to revitalize our Office of International Commerce, helping our business leaders distribute goods and services across the globe,” said Gov. Maggie Hassan. “I am proud that these efforts are being recognized nationally and look forward to continue expanding upon these efforts, which strengthen our economy, our communities and our state.”

In 2015, exports of New Hampshire products totaled over $4 billion. Nationwide, U.S. exports totaled $2.23 trillion, accounting for nearly 13 percent of U.S. GDP and supporting about 11.5 million jobs.

“I am pleased and proud that our Office of International Commerce is recognized on the national level for its work in promoting export expansion,” said Jeffrey Rose, commissioner of the Department of Resources and Economic Development. “The E Award illustrates the success we have when we work together with partners, like the US Department of Commerce and the Small Business Administration, to accomplish the goal of helping New Hampshire businesses find new customers in overseas markets.”

The Office of International Commerce was nominated through the Department of Commerce’s U.S. Commercial Service network. It was one of 123 companies and organizations receiving the award.

For more information about exporting and resources available to New Hampshire businesses, visit www.exportnh.org.

New Hampshire Joining US Delegation at Hannover Messe 2016

Tuesday, April 19th, 2016

NHatHannoverRepresentatives from the New Hampshire Division of Economic Development will join the largest US delegation ever to attend Hannover Messe, the world’s largest industrial trade fair, April 25-29.

For the first time in the trade show’s history, the United States is the featured country; President Obama joins German Chancellor Angela Merkel to open this year’s event. Hannover Messe typically hosts over 200,000 people from more than 70 countries, including global investors, buyers, distributors and government officials.

“Taking part in this premier trade show puts New Hampshire in front of the world and gives us a platform to talk to international companies about the benefits of investing or expanding in the Granite State,” said Jeffrey Rose, commissioner of the Department of Resources and Economic Development. “Direct foreign investment is a key driver of our state’s economy, with dozens of foreign companies located in New Hampshire, who are growing and thriving here.”

Lorentz

Director Carmen Lorentz

Tina

Tina Kasim, Office of International Commerce

Carmen Lorentz, director of the Division of Economic Development, and Tina Kasim, of the Office of International Commerce, will attend the trade show.

“We’re looking forward to meeting with global companies and talking to them about the state’s favorable business climate, educated workforce and possible partnerships in our key industry sectors, including aerospace and defense; advanced composites manufacturing and life sciences research and manufacturing,” Lorentz said.

The Division of Economic Development, part of the New Hampshire Department of Resources and Economic Development, is the one-stop resource for business information and assistance for companies within the state and those from outside looking to expand or relocate their business here. For more information, visit nheconomy.com.

Lorna Colquhoun
Communications Director
Division of Economic Development

 

Commissioner Rose: The Value of Trade Missions to New Hampshire

Monday, June 2nd, 2014

Later this month, Gov. Hassan and I will accompany representatives of seven New Hampshire companies on a trade mission to Turkey, the first in several years. We are excited about the prospect of making connections in a country whose economy is vibrant and eager to do business with us.

International trade plays a vital role in our state’s economy and the legislature recognized this when it passed the bipartisan budget, which included funding for the state to resume trade missions. The International Trade Resource Center has organized trade missions over the past 15 years, to countries including Brazil, Chile, England, France, India, Ireland, Italy and the Netherlands. The cumulative result of these trips was tens of millions in contracts to businesses and manufacturers right here at home and relationships that helped to keep our state strong in challenging times.

A key to growth and prosperity for any company is the ability to find new customers. Securing global markets diversifies their bottom line. Trade missions offer connections and opportunities for our companies, which typically don’t have the means to hire export specialists. With a trade mission, we can offer resources to open many doors in a short time, such as partnering with the U.S. Department of Commerce and local business organizations in the host country to find potential partners.

Having the governor lead the mission elevates our companies as they meet with business and government organizations. This would not happen for a business going it alone.

When New Hampshire, and the nation, suffered through the recession a few years ago, we weathered it far better than some of our neighbors. This was, in large part, because our businesses sought out overseas markets to diversify their customer base, gain more orders and, most importantly, keep their employees working. That’s why in 2010, we set a record for exporting, sending $4.4 billion worth of goods around the world.

In 2013, New Hampshire led the nation in export growth, increasing its merchandise exports by more than 22 percent, to $4.3 billion. This demonstrates that our businesses and manufacturers can design, create and make products and components that are in demand around the world.

The momentum continues into 2014. Planning began months ago for the state’s first overseas trade mission since 2011 and included months of research, discussion about the needs of our businesses and where the demand is for their products and services.

Turkey quickly emerged as an important market for several reasons: It’s our 12th largest trading partner – last year, we sent $79 million in goods and services there. Its geographical location, at the crossroads of Europe, Asia, Africa and the Middle East, makes it an attractive hub and there are increasing opportunities for our businesses, especially in areas such as aerospace and defense, health and medical technologies, education and construction machinery.

With the assistance of the Turkish Cultural Center in Manchester and the partnership with TUSKON (representing seven business federations, 202 business associations and over 50,000 entrepreneurs), we have arranged five full days of introductions, meetings and networking for our businesses in Istanbul and Ankara, as well as a news conference providing even wider exposure for the state.

In March, the state was running $25 million ahead of its revenue plan for the year, a solid fiscal position. April revenues fell significantly short of the previous year, although the state continues to run $3.9 million over its projections.

As a precaution in case revenues continue to fall, Gov. Hassan issued an executive order that includes a freeze on out-of-state travel. At that time, the governor and I, our businesses and our partners had discussions about whether to cancel the trade mission.

But the state, the participating companies and our partners in Turkey had already made significant financial investments into this trade mission, months before revenues dropped and the freeze was enacted.

I cannot overstate the value of international trade to New Hampshire’s economy and how eager our businesses are to explore exporting and to send their goods to global markets. The legislature agreed.

To cancel this trade mission would result in significant losses not only to our businesses, but in potential economic growth for New Hampshire.

 

Jeffrey Rose is the commissioner of the New Hampshire Department of Resources and Economic Development.