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Posts Tagged ‘Plymouth State University’

New Hampshire – Canada Trade Council Hosting Business Development Forum 10/27

Tuesday, October 17th, 2017

A day-long business forum aimed at strengthening ties between New Hampshire and Canada and encouraging companies there to expand over the border is planned for Oct. 27 at the Mountain View Grand.

The New Hampshire – Canada Business Development Forum is organized by the New Hampshire-Canada Trade Council and the New Hampshire Department of Business and Economic Affairs. With 2016 exports valued at over $500 million, Canada is the state’s largest trading partner.

The forum will include a discussion about North American Free Trade Agreement negotiation, with speakers David Alward, Canadian Consul General to New England, and former representative Mary Estelle Ryckman of the Office of US Trade; US Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, member of the Foreign Relations Committee, has also been invited to speak.

Victoria Cimino, director of the New Hampshire Division of Travel and Tourism Development; Dr. Katherine Harrington of Plymouth State University’s Bienvenue project and University System of New Hampshire Chancellor Todd Leach head a panel discussion about promoting the state’s cultural and natural resources.

The economic opportunities the state offers to Canadians will be discussed by panelists Taylor Caswell, commissioner of the BEA; Marie-Josee Vaillant of Kheops International, Colebrook, and Michel Pariseau of the Department of Homeland Security.

The event, which is being held at the Mountain View Grand in Whitefield, is free, but space is limited. Register here before Oct. 23.

 

 

Globalization and New Hampshire: Survey Looks at Contribution of International Trade to NH Economy

Wednesday, November 16th, 2016
psu

Dr. Roxana Wright , Dr. Chen Wu ~ Plymouth State University

New Hampshire companies looking for new business suppliers and international partnerships, as well as companies aiming to understand their contribution to the state economy, will be interested in a new globalization study underway at Plymouth State University, in collaboration with the New Hampshire Department of Resources and Economic Development.

We have created the project New Hampshire Economic Globalization Report: Contributions and Opportunities for the Local Economy, which will use data on international trade transactions and direct investment from foreign companies to map the distribution of foreign direct investments (FDI) and international trade within the state and across counties. This information will enable us to explore the impact FDI and trade flows have on the economy across counties and industries, and the performance of domestic and foreign subsidiaries.


Take the survey here.


This study is important because it provides valuable information that can help shape state policy and assist exporters and importers in identifying markets. This study includes a survey, in which we encourage business owners and executives to participate.

Encouraging globalization is good for the New Hampshire economy, as 43,400 people were employed by 456 foreign subsidiaries, and trade supported 183,900 (or 22 percent of) New Hampshire jobs in 2014. The importance of these investigations is far reaching in terms of state policy, such as serving the needs of New Hampshire exporters and stimulating trade and FDI as a means for economic development, income growth and improving our business climate.

The analysis will result in measurement and prediction of contributions that FDI and trade bring to the local economies in terms of employment, investment promotion, exports facilitation, labor conditions, technology/know-how spillovers and social welfare. This FDI mapping is meaningful to policy makers who intend to support the development of certain locations/counties or of particular industries and provides key information to foreign companies looking to establish operations in New Hampshire.

We highly appreciate your participation in the survey. Should you have any question about the survey, please contact Dr. Chen Wu at  or Dr. Roxana Wright.

 

NSF $1.2M Grant to Support Hanover-Plymouth-Manchester High Bandwidth Research and Education Network

Wednesday, September 16th, 2009

Plans for high speed linkages that connect Northern New Hampshire to Manchester and extend into additional networks in Northern New England received a major boost when the National Science Foundation (NSF) announced a $1.2 million grant to support building this fiber path.  The funds will create new linkages among higher education institutions in New Hampshire, including the University of New Hampshire, Plymouth State University and Dartmouth College to help support collaborative research and education initiatives regionally, nationally, and internationally.

broadband-1Funds are being awarded through the NSF’s EPSCoR (Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research) Office’s Research Infrastructure Improvement Program Track-2 grant (RII Track-2).  The University of New Hampshire, which hosts the New Hampshire EPSCoR Office, is the grant recipient.  The University System of New Hampshire operates the current network that serves its four institutions and provides Internet and connectivity services to the Community College System of New Hampshire, and several K-12 schools, libraries, public service centers, and public health and safety organizations across the state.  These funds will, in part, help advance larger efforts to develop a regional optical network that will have significantly greater bandwidth speed and help address current and future bandwidth demands. 

“This research and corresponding network development will thrust New Hampshire and the northeast region into the international research stage with the ability to collaborate with cyber-enabled tools and resources in ways that have not yet been possible,” said Scott Valcourt, UNH director of project management and consulting services for information technology and the New Hampshire principal investigator.  “That research will have other economic development and quality of life benefits for New Hampshire citizens.”

The grant is a result of collaborative work by multiple NSF EPSCoR states that helped form the Northeast Cyberinfrastructure Consortium (NECC) in 2006.  Officials in Maine, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Delaware initiated two related efforts to identify and promote the shared use of research facilities across the region and assess and address cyber-infrastructure needs. The NSF EPSCoR grant, combined with the National Institutes of Health Centers of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE) Supplement grant award to Dartmouth in August 2009, adds research infrastructure in a region of the country where the lack of bandwidth presents a significant barrier to tapping regional and national resources. The COBRE Supplement will extend the core research network to include Keene State College.

“Many of our leading academic centers that are constrained by the current fiber capacity will benefit, including the Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans and Space at UNH, the Northern New England Computing Grid that is led by Dartmouth, and the Plymouth State University Meteorology Program,” said Tom Franke, the USNH chief information officer.  “The fiber optic path will also continue to the University of Vermont, creating another significant opportunity for research collaboration.”

The NECC states have created NEBC (North East Bioinformatics Collaborative), a virtual organization that facilitates research projects that require data analysis for large data sets. Pilot projects on issues such as algae blooms are planned and the regional network will enable participating states to collaborate, exchange students, and work together from remote locations by taking advantage of video conferencing and other high speed services not currently available. The majority of the funds will be used for 12 fiber strands from Manchester to Plymouth to Hanover, the electronic equipment to operate the fiber network, and support for student participants in the algae bloom studies taking place in the NECC states. 

The NSF established EPSCoR to assist states that traditionally have received lower levels of federal funding. Since New Hampshire became an EPSCoR jurisdiction in 2004, more than $15 million in EPSCoR research grants have been awarded by NSF, NASA, and the departments of energy and defense. NH EPSCoR is administered by the University of New Hampshire with oversight by a 14-member committee composed of representatives from industry, government and academia.