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Posts Tagged ‘Portsmouth’

The NH Job Training Fund is a Many Spendored Thing

Tuesday, September 1st, 2015

September is the month when the kids go back to school, the calendar kicks over to fall and no matter how old you are, the conditioning of our minds over all the years of grammar, middle and high school and college puts us in learning mode.

So it may be a good time for your employees to go back to the classroom and learn about latest processes and technology that will keep your business competitive. The New Hampshire Job Training Fund is open to businesses located in New Hampshire and businesses intending to locate here, and who pay quarterly taxes into the state’s Unemployment Trust Fund.

Businesses large and small have received grants and yours can, too.

It’s worth a few moments to see how it helped Destefano Architects of Portsmouth and then give us a call today.

Lorna Colquhoun
Communications Director
Division of Economic Development


5 Questions with High Liner Foods

Friday, March 13th, 2015

High Liner Foods is the largest prepared seafood processing operation in North America. Last year, the company reported $1 billion in annual sales for the first time in its 115-year history and capped a terrific 2014 by moving its US headquarters from Danvers, Mass. to the Pease International Tradeport in Portsmouth.

Keith Decker, president and COO of High Liner Foods, said of moving the business from Massachusetts to New Hampshire, “The relocation and design of the new building will help us serve our customers better and attract and retain the top talent required for continued growth into the future.”

To get some valuable insights into the business relocation process, we interviewed Jim LaBelle, vice president of food service marketing, and Mark Leslie, vice president of business integration and special projects, at High Liner Foods. Both worked directly with Michael Bergeron, senior business development manager at the Division of Economic Development, to facilitate the move.

High Liner Foods invested $1 million in its test kitchen.

High Liner Foods invested $1 million in its test kitchen.

Thinking back to the beginning of your relocation process, what were the biggest factors that inspired you to explore the idea of relocating?

The biggest factor for us was we sold our existing facility to a company that needed our production space, which we no longer needed. That necessitated a need to find a new office facility for our US headquarters team.

What were the main reasons New Hampshire came out on top for you?

We wanted to be closer to our production facility, which is in Portsmouth. We wanted a modern but affordable solution that could be a showcase facility for our employees and customers. And we wanted a standalone building. New Hampshire rose to the top with all three of our criteria.

You worked with Michael Bergeron at DED during your relocation project. What were two or three of the most helpful things he did for you?

Michael helped us put together an initial meeting with city officials to discuss a couple of outstanding issues before we selected the site, put us in touch with local health officials to work through permitting issues, and explained potential government economic development incentives available to us in New Hampshire. He was invaluable throughout the process.
What advice would you give to other companies exploring a move to another state?

It’s important to develop a network of local experts and officials that you can reach out to when issues arise for resolution input. It’s also helpful to understand what economic development opportunities and incentives might be available.

What’s next for High Liner Foods? What big things do you have planned for 2015?

At High Liner Foods, we’re focused on bringing our customers innovative, on-trend seafood products to help them succeed, so that is always our main priority. We’re also excited to now be able to host our customers in a world-class facility in a world-class community.

Seacoast Aerospace Initiative: Cleared for Take-off; Aero/Defense Business Cleared to Land

Wednesday, May 14th, 2014

The Seacoast Aerospace Initiative launched Monday, with the ceremonial signing of a letter that clears for landing Canadian aerospace companies looking for opportunity to expand in one of New Hampshire’s fastest growing sectors.

The initiative came about in 2012, as Albany International and Safran were preparing for their co-location in Rochester, and the need to prepare for the growth of the industry.

The Seacoast Aerospace Initiative

The Seacoast Aerospace Initiative

For the past 18 months, a partnership that included officials from Dover, Portsmouth, Rochester and Somersworth, as well as the Pease International Tradeport, Great Bay Community College and the University of New Hampshire and we here at the New Hampshire Division of Economic Development, has been working to position this region as a hub for composites manufacturing.

Fast forward to this week and we celebrated a milestone: The signing of a letter – in French – inviting Quebec aerospace companies and suppliers not only  to expand here, but to work with us in other areas, such as research and education.

“This collaboration has strengthened the Seacoast’s position as a leader in the aerospace and defense industry,” said Gov. Maggie Hassan. “This is win-win for everybody – the companies involved, the cities, the Seacoast, the state and for our people. It’s a good day for business in New Hampshire.”

Quebec is our closest neighbor to the north and we share more than an international border; we owe much to them for our history, culture and work ethic.

“Montreal is the national hub for aerospace,” said Thierry Weissenburger, senior trade commissioner of the Canadian Consulate in Boston. “This collaboration is happening as burgeoning trade is going on and I expect it grow massively.”

If you recall, our aerospace industry got a boost when the New Hampshire Aerospace and Defense Export Consortium signed a MOU with Aero Montreal in December, paving the way for our aerospace companies to have preferred relationships with their counterparts in Quebec.


Marianne Bonnard

“This happened six months ago and already you are moving on with the next steps,” said Marianne Bonnard, with the Quebec delegation. “You are already moving on to the step and I think that says a lot about the determination of the region here and of our cooperation.”

With that came the ceremonial signing of the letter by our Commissioner Jeffrey Rose, of the Department of Resources and Economic Development; Mayors Karen Weston of Dover, Robert Lister of Portsmouth, T.J. Dean of Rochester, Dana Hilliard of Somersworth, and Arthur Nickless Jr., chairman of the Pease Development Authority.

“This regional hub is the centerpiece for our state’s economy, built around aerospace and defense,” Rose said. “We’re ready for take-off on the Seacoast.”


Lorna Colquhoun

Communications Director

NH Division of Economic Development