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Lights! Camera! Action! Curtain Rises on Video Contest

August 28th, 2014

The back-to-school bells are ringing across New Hampshire this week and students are getting back to the business of learning.

PrintCoinciding with the start of another academic year, Gov. Hassan and Commissioner Rose have launched the What’s So Cool About Manufacturing? video contest. Aimed at 8th graders, the contest will pair students with a local manufacturer with a goal of introducing them to the prospects in advanced manufacturing that await them when they graduate in just a few years.

Through their lens, they will have fun exploring the manufacturing process, the cool things things made right here in the Granite State and a possible career opportunities.

“By creating partnerships between job-creating manufacturing companies and local schools, the What’s So Cool About Manufacturing? video contest will help our students understand that they can stay in New Hampshire and find jobs here that are interesting and exciting,” Gov. Hassan said. “This contest will also help build relationships that can lead to a stronger workforce pipeline to fill the jobs that growing businesses are creating here in New Hampshire, helping this critical industry continue to thrive.”

Nashua High School helped us in producing a pilot video. Students partnered with Johnson Precision in Hudson and together, they came up with a terrific video that even has a twist at the end. (Click here to view it.)

“This video contest is a great introduction for students to meet their local manufacturers – manufacturers they may pass on their way to school every day,” Commissioner Rose said. “The contest brings both of them together so that these companies can showcase exciting opportunities to the students, some of whom may well become employees in a few years. Advanced manufacturing and our middle school students are the future in New Hampshire and this is a way for them to connect.”

Students and their advisers can begin working with a local manufacturer on the video at the start of the 2014-2015 school year and must submit their projects by Dec. 1. A winner will be selected in early 2015 and we are working on some really great prizes for the winning videos.

Teachers interested in taking part can get more information here on partnering with a local manufacturer, as well as video contest rules. You may also contact me at 271-2341 or via email.

Lights! Camera! Action! We can’t wait to see your video.

 

Lorna Colquhoun

Communications Director

Division of Economic Development

Hooksett Welcome Centers: Northbound Soon to Offer Some Services

August 21st, 2014

 

CarmenAlexRay

Carmen Lorentz of the NH Division of Economic Development and Alex Ray of the Common Man

The redevelopment of the Hooksett Welcome Centers, north and southbound on Interstate 93, has been watched by daily commuters since construction began.

Now, the liquor store and convenience store on the northbound side are getting ready to open in the next few weeks; southbound will follow in a few months.

On our monthly radio show, New Hampshire Business Matters, on WTPL 107.7 FM, Carmen Lorentz, director of the Division of Economic Development, talked with Alex Ray of the Common Man, about the project and how it is going to do more than welcome visitors to our great state.

Listen in on the link below.

Lorna Colquhoun

Communications Director

NH Division of Economic Development

Madbury Commons Transforming Downtown Durham, Technology

August 11th, 2014

Carol Miller is the director of broadband technology here at the New Hampshire Division of Economic Development. She reports on the groundbreaking ceremony on Aug. 6, signifying the start of one of the state’s largest developments getting underway. Ed.

 

Education and investment are alive and well in Durham, as the development of Madbury Commons gets underway in the downtown.

Jeff Rubin, Golden Goose Capital, developing Madbury Commons.

This is a large multi-use project by Durham-based Golden Goose Capital. It will feature 126 apartments housing 525 students and 45,000 square feet of commercial space. The anchor tenant in this $30 million development will be the University of New Hampshire’s InterOperability Lab. UNH officials signed a 20-year lease earlier this year.

The development is one of the largest in motion in New Hampshire and hits the right themes in terms of the state’s economy. As the home to hundreds of college students and the IOL, Madbury Commons is going to be a boon on many fronts. From this, we can expect to see about 1,500 visitors annually, from all over the world.

The IOL is a technology company wholly-owned by UNH, which is dedicated to the testing of wireless products for companies such as Samsung, Google and Apple. The UNH-IOL is dedicated to fostering cooperation within the data communications industry, while providing hands-on experience to future engineers.

This development will require large capacity gigabit broadband to serve the needs of students, the IOL and other commercial tenants

Madbury Commons is the remarkable result of vision, investment and education and I look forward to the ribbon cutting ceremony in about a year’s time, which will signify the opening of this development.

 

Carol Miller

Director, Broadband Technology

NH Division of Economic Development

 

Commissioner Rose: Exporting a Vital Part of NH Economy

August 6th, 2014

The recent article exploring New Hampshire’s exports, while interesting, drew conclusions that diminishes our role in a record-setting year for US exports.

In 2013, the United States set an all-time record – $2.3 trillion – for the value of goods exported around the world. New Hampshire was a part of that success, with strategic growth in some of our higher paying sectors, such as electronics, optics and military/defense components.

The US Department of Commerce uses a complex methodology to measure exports and their growth – methodology that has been in place for decades and which determines the value of each state’s activity in the global marketplace. The data provided is the accepted measure of exports by state and federal agencies, as well as the United Nations and the International Monetary Fund.

By using the Origin of Movement (OM) series, the Department of Commerce determines the breakdown of over $2 trillion in exports. The OM can be the location of where the item was produced or the location of a distributor, warehouse or cargo processing facility. New Hampshire export statistics credit the movement of oil into the state, just as another state receives credit for millions of dollars’ worth of components produced in New Hampshire.

The results can, indeed, be curious; such as how much oil the Granite State is credited with exporting or how much gold leaves Massachusetts or how many diamonds from New York. It is important to recognize that New Hampshire is by no means the only state that exports goods not usually associated with its leading industries.

OM is not a perfect system, largely because it was never designed to measure production. But it is the accepted way to calculate the worth of the nation’s exports. Under the definitions and regulations in place, oil is a New Hampshire export.

It is also important to note that there is more to exporting than the merchandise goods the OM series covers. Services, like consulting and financial services, as well as tourism and education, two important sectors in our economy, are considered exports, but they are not calculated in data compiled by the federal agency.

Exporting is a vital part of the state’s economy and every year, more of our companies are tapping into markets around the world with great success. Our record makes our state attractive to foreign investors, companies looking to expand in the US and international students seeking a quality education.

To simply extract the value of oil that flows through New Hampshire and proclaim the total to be credible data is overly simplistic and gives no credit to thousands of companies in New Hampshire contributing to the nation’s exporting success.

 

Jeffrey Rose

Commissioner

NH  Department of Resources and Economic Development

Hooksett Welcome Centers: We’re Almost There!

August 4th, 2014

 

If you’re a frequent driver along Interstate 93, you’ve watched the Hooksett Welcome Center redevelopment take shape on both sides of the highway.

It has been a pretty amazing project that is coming together out of a unique public-private partnership (between the State of New Hampshire and Granite State Hospitality).

Coming together quickly, we might add. In a little more than a month, the New Hampshire Liquor and Wine Outlet Stores will open on both sides of the highway, along with the convenience store and the restrooms on the northbound side. Those amenities will open southbound in December and a grand opening for both centers will happen next spring.

If you are a just-the-facts kind of person, here are some interesting stats:

- About 200 workers are onsite daily at the two centers;

- Over 95 percent of the workers, contractors, subcontractors and materials are from New Hampshire;

- Monthly construction expenditures average about $3 million;

- Over 3 million visitors will stop at the centers annually.

We took a tour recently of the northbound center, which, you will see in the video, is coming along nicely. What a great way to greet visitors on their journeys to the Granite State.

Lorna Colquhoun

Communications Director

NH Division of Economic Development

Government Contracting: Uncle Sam Needs Your Business

July 30th, 2014

NHPTAPThe government is an untapped market in need of what New Hampshire businesses produce and there is assistance available for those companies who would like to do business with Uncle Sam.

The New Hampshire Procurement Technical Assistance Program (PTAP) offers free training and events to help businesses of all sizes tap into this viable market. (Click on the free training link for upcoming events).

“The US government spent over $100 billion on contracts with small businesses last year,” said David Pease, program manager of NH-PTAP.

The introductory and training seminars PTAP conducts are held in every region of the state, many aimed at the specific types of businesses in those regions that can fill the various needs of the government.

For example, in the Seacoast area, there are contracts for painting, environmental services and more. Around Keene and Claremont, there are companies that could fill the government’s needs for parks maintenance with landscaping, fuel delivery and other project opportunities. In the Manchester area, there is a constant need for companies to handle security contracts, hospitality services and more. The Lakes Region needs caterers and the North Country needs food products for the federal prison in Berlin. In all these areas, the government could do with contracts for commercial real estate.

With all these opportunities available what is holding New Hampshire businesses back from reaching for the government contacts available? For many, it is the intimidating rules and regulations that come with these contracts.

“The reason PTAP exists is because the government is a very large market and it is so different from regular business,  that it takes knowledge to be competitive,” Pease said.

This is where NH-PTAP becomes a valuable resource.

NH-PTAP assisted a company in Dover that makes strap-based products in securing a government contract to make seatbelts for shopping carts. In Epping, a fire arms training school won a federal contract to teach various classes. Up north in Dalton, Team O’Neil won a contract to instruct US Special Forces in high level driving skills.

What need can your product fill for the government? Contact NH-PTAP at 603-271-7581 or online. If you have any questions, contact Amanda Duquette or call 603-271-7581.

 

Alicia Gagne

Intern

NH Division of Economic Development

 

 

New Hampshire Export Data

July 17th, 2014

Lots of talk about New Hampshire exports this week: Here’s how we found out about our record growth last February from the US Department of Commerce, which compares New Hampshire’s export activities with 49 other states.

For a look at New Hampshire commodities, click over here.

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                  Contact:        Justin Oslowski (603) 953-0212

February 11, 2014                                                                 Curt Cultice (202) 482-2253

EXPORT GROWTH BENEFITS NEW HAMPSHIRE COMPANIES
2013 New Hampshire merchandise exports are up 23 percent from last year

WASHINGTON – The International Trade Administration (ITA) today announced that new data show New Hampshire merchandise exports increased 22.6 percent in 2013 compared to 2012, growing from $3.5 billion to $4.3 billion.  New Hampshire’s strong performance in 2013 helped the United States reach an all-time record for exports of U.S. goods and services, reaching $2.3 trillion in 2013 and supporting nearly 10 million American jobs.

“U.S. exporters continue to pursue new avenues to world customers, offering some of the most advanced and cutting edge products and services in the marketplace today,” said Ken Hyatt, Acting Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade. “Through the National Export Initiative, President Obama is committed to helping U.S. businesses maximize their export potential which support good, high-wage jobs for the working men and women in New Hampshire and across America.”

New Hampshire’s merchandise export sales in 2013 outpaced the 2012 figures in many top destinations, including: the Czech Republic (+236 percent); Saudi Arabia (+196 percent); the United Arab Emirates (+161 percent); Colombia (+130 percent); and Canada (+109 percent). Key merchandise export categories include: computer and electronic products; oil and gas; machinery manufactures; fabricated metal products; and electrical equipment.

“These export numbers show that New Hampshire exporters continue to take advantage of international growth opportunities to diversify their market portfolios and grow their businesses, which benefits the local economy,” said Justin Oslowski, Director of the U.S. Commercial Service in Durham. “By selling internationally, many of these exporters are better able to weather changes in the economy while building their global competitiveness and supporting jobs here at home.”

With more than 100 offices across the United States and in American Embassies and Consulates in more than 70 countries, ITA’s U.S. Commercial Service connects U.S. companies with international buyers. In 2013, ITA helped U.S. businesses facilitate nearly 15,000 export successes. Companies interested in exporting should contact their local office in Durham at (603) 953-0212 or visit www.export.gov/NewHampshire<http://www.export.gov/NewHampshire>.

For more information about the impact of exports on individual states, including fact sheets for all 50 states, please visit the Trade Policy & Analysis web page at www.trade.gov/mas/ian<http://www.trade.gov/mas/ian>.

New England Governors, Eastern Canadian Premiers Meet in New Hampshire

July 15th, 2014

Once a year, the governors of the six New England states and premiers of the five eastern provinces of Canada come together for a day to look at the common issues and challenges they face … and ways to solve them.

This year, for the first time in about 20 years, they met in New Hampshire, at the Omni Mount Washington Hotel (where, by the way, delegates from 44 Allied nations met 70 years ago this month to stabilize Europe and the world following World War II). By the end of the day at the 38th annual conference of New England Governors and Eastern Canadian Premiers, the leaders adopted resolutions relating to energy, economic development and transportation.

“The economies of the New England states and Eastern Canadian provinces are linked, and further collaboration on economic development and energy will help create jobs, protect our natural resources and improve the economies of all our states and provinces,” said Gov. Maggie Hassan, who co-hosted the event with Newfoundland and Labrador Premier Tom Marshall.

Conference1

Christopher Wrenn, NHADEC ~ Commissioner Jeffery Rose

Discussing the regional economy was a priority of Hassan’s and she assembled a panel from both sides of the border for the session, Strengthening Partnerships for Regional Economic Development, which was moderated by Commissioner Jeffrey Rose of the Department of Resources and Economic Development.

Aerospace was one of the topics and was a great platform for discussion of New Hampshire’s efforts in helping one of its fastest growing industries take off. Christopher Wrenn, chairman of the New Hampshire Aerospace and Defense Export Consortium, talked about the organization’s evolution over the past 18 months, including the signing of an MOU last December with AeroMontreal, concluding that the consortium “is poised to do great things.”

Martin LaFleur, a senior director with AeroMontreal, called it a “promising partnership,” in line with his organization’s goal of establishing an aerospace corridor in the northeast.

“Our competition isn’t between ourselves,” he said, “but emerging countries.”

At the conclusion of the session, the governors and premiers agreed on an economic development resolution. It calls for the NEG/ECP’s coordinating committee to establish a process of identifying challenges to regional economic development and trade, as well as opportunities enhancing the region’s competitiveness.

Expect an interim report due at next year’s conference in St. John, Newfoundland, and a final report at the 2016 conference.

The other resolutions include: Directing the Northeast International Committee on Energy to organize a Regional Forum in late 2014 for a public-private sector dialogue on the ongoing changes to the region’s energy landscape and the Transportation and Air Quality Committee  to continue its work to enhance transportation choices.

 

Lorna Colquhoun

Communications Director

NH Division of Economic Development

Add the Government to Your Client List – Sign up for a FREE PTAP Seminar

July 2nd, 2014

Government contracting.

These two words can be intimidating, especially for small businesses that can’t dedicate a team to keep up with the ever-changing rules and regulations that guide the process.

Intimidation aside, however, the fact is government contracting offers a steady revenue stream from a reliable business partner. Obtaining a government contract can be a timely and complicated process, but typically turns out to be more than rewarding for the effort expended.

PrintAnd while a small business may not have the acumen to navigate the process itself, it can count on help – free help – from the New Hampshire Procurement and Technical Assistance Program (NH-PTAP).

NH-PTAP provides technical assistance, workshops and training events aimed at small businesses, educating them about the process. Our staff maintains a calendar of training seminars, which are held all over the state.

The government buys a huge variety of products and services and businesses considering adding it as a customer should carve out time to attend an informative seminar in Keene on July 10, Introduction to Government Contracting and Support Services.

Think of it as Government Contracting 101. Those attending will get an idea of what government contracting is, what it entails and how NH-PTAP can help. The seminar will cover the structure, scale and diversity of government contracting; how it differs from business-to-business contracting; getting through red tape and other solutions. Businesses will also get an assessment of how ready they are for government contracting and setting realistic expectations as they get started.

On July 17, the Subcontractor Training seminar is offered in Berlin, which is one event beneficial for businesses looking to get their foot in the door on government contracting, or just wants a better understanding of what it might entail. Topics covered include how to partner with a company already contracting with the government and how to do business with the prime contractors.

As the dog days of summer come on, it’s a good time for businesses to take a look at their goals and plans for the rest of the year and government contracting may well offer a great opportunity to expand and grow.

For more information and to register online, visit the NH-PTAP website or call program manager David Pease at 271-7581.

 

Alicia Gagne

Intern

NH Division of Economic Development

 

 

 

NH Turkey Trade Mission: Extraordinary Experience

June 27th, 2014

(Commissioner Jeffrey Rose returns today from Turkey, following a week-long trade mission to that country, led by Gov. Hassan. Also accompanying the governor were representatives of seven New Hampshire businesses – Comptus of Thornton; Conductive Compounds of Hudson; Demers & Blaisdell of Concord; Hinkley Allen of Concord; Mae Consulting of Deerfield; Rokon of Rochester and Ulysses Advisory Group of East Kingston.)

Turkey-6-24-007

Gov. Hassan delivered the keynote speech to the Kaza Women and Business Association.

Our trade mission to Turkey has been an extraordinary experience. Our companies had over 100 business-to-business meetings and are returning home with dozens of high quality leads. Gov. Hassan went non-stop over the past week, meeting with many of the most senior business people in the country and receiving high praise from the more than 200 businesses she directly connected with during the mission. Some of the most gratifying moments of the trade mission came in her meetings with women business leaders and how inspired they were by her.

Financing being a key factor in international trade and economic development, we met with Garanti Bank, the leading private bank in Turkey.  The U.S., through the Overseas Private Investment Corp. (OPIC), has invested hundreds of millions of dollars in Turkey, with a particular emphasis on women-owned businesses.

Garanti Bank’s contributions have made a positive impact here and since nearly 20 percent of OPIC’s investments have been projects in Turkey (our long-standing NATO partner), this underscores its importance to the U.S.

During the trade mission, I met with numerous senior level executives representing companies eyeing expansion into the U.S. market – a receptive audience for outlining the benefits of expanding to New Hampshire and to map out potential options for their consideration.

Of note is a fast growing international company seeking a potential warehouse/distribution center here in the Northeast.  Its overseas investment director was very interested in our lower cost of doing business, compared to rest of the region.  Another company that stood out is a leading forest-products company in Turkey, interested in our timber and mill capacity.  The company is very successful in Turkey and looking to grow in markets around the globe.

Thursday was another busy day for Gov. Hassan, the seven New Hampshire businesses taking part in this trade mission, and our team from DRED. Starting with breakfast, joined by a diverse group of Parliament members, it was followed by a robust discussion about government processes in Turkey and U.S, as well as how important international trade is in providing opportunities and benefits for both countries.

The opportunity to talk about New Hampshire’s growing aerospace and defense sectors came in a meeting I, and members of the New Hampshire Aerospace and Defense Export Consortium, had with leaders of the OSTIM Defense and Aviation Custer of Turkey.  We had a spirited discussion about the important role the sector plays in both our economies and the collective efforts to organize and promote emerging clusters in both countries.  It was an opportunity to highlight two New Hampshire companies on the trade mission – Rokon of Rochester and Conductive Compounds of Hudson – and develop networking opportunities for them to engage with the Turkish industry.  We also discussed best practices and picked up some dynamic ideas to bring back to our growing NHADEC organization.

To talk more about the opportunities for New Hampshire businesses to make strategic investments into Turkey, I met with Ahmet Erdem, head of Investor Services Department with the Republic of Turkey Prime Ministry Investment Support and Promotion Agency of Turkey (ISPAT).  We discussed the emerging sectors within the rapidly growing Turkish economy and incentive programs there to help spur international investment.  The country’s investment system targets geographic locations, strategic sectors, R&D, and duty/tax reductions.  With its growing purchasing power and its location at the cross roads of Asia, Middle East, Africa and Europe, Turkey is attracting lots of foreign investment.

I enjoyed the opportunity to meet with Metin Deger, head of the Ministry of Economy for the Republic of Turkey, and speak about the benefits of Turkish companies investing in New Hampshire.  He is responsible for counseling Turkish companies on overseas investments and helps identify markets for companies.  He was impressed with what the Granite State offers foreign investors, particularly our strategic geographic location, skilled workforce and low tax structure.  It was a great discussion and once we provide some more information, he will promote New Hampshire to a variety of industries, associations and business groups.

I need to again thank our hosts – the Turkish Cultural Center and TUSKON – for their efforts in making our trade mission with Turkey so successful. Those efforts, which included months of planning and highly coordinated logistics, were extraordinary.

I am confident this is just the beginning of a long term relationship that will continue to yield fruits for both countries as we seeking opportunities to grow trade between New Hampshire and Turkey.

 

Jeffrey Rose

Commissioner

New Hampshire Department of Resources and Economic Development


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