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Posts Tagged ‘Commissioner Taylor Caswell’

State, City Collaboration Bringing New Tech Jobs to Manchester: BAE Systems Expanding NH Footprint with Big Plans in Manchester

Wednesday, September 26th, 2018

The New Hampshire Department of Business and Economic Affairs, the City of Manchester, and the New Hampshire Business Finance Authority are pleased to announce expansion plans by one of New Hampshire’s largest employers and leader in its aerospace and defense industry.

BAE Systems is finalizing plans to occupy 3000 Goffs Falls Rd. to expand its operations. The 220,000-sf site, located off Brown Avenue, with close access to Manchester-Boston Regional Airport and Interstates 93 and 293, will enable the company to attract the talent it needs to initially fill 400 high-paying positions.  The Manchester Mayor and Board of Aldermen will consider details on the proposed expansion.

“This is a great example of how working quickly and creatively with the business community can yield impressive results,” said Gov. Chris Sununu. “No income or sales tax, great schools, incredible natural beauty, ease of access to urban centers  and a vibrant and dynamic workforce all contribute to there really being no better place to live, work and raise a family.  We look forward to continuing to work collaboratively to meet the needs BAE Systems expansion efforts and bring more job opportunities to Granite Staters.”

Taylor Caswell, commissioner of the Department of Business and Economic Affairs, said a collaborative effort with BAE Systems, the City of Manchester and the Business Finance Authority supported the needs of the company in making the decision to expand.

“There is no way we would have reached this point without deep collaboration among teams from our department, the City of Manchester, and the NH Business Finance Authority,” said Caswell. “Our ability to work as a team to help employers meet expansion or relocation goals is critical to what we offer as a state.”

The City of Manchester will continue its support of BAE Systems’ expansion, said Mayor Joyce Craig.

“I’m thrilled BAE Systems has chosen to expand here in Manchester,” she said. “Manchester is the economic hub for the state. This is the first time the City of Manchester, the Department of Business and Economic Affairs and the Business Finance Authority have worked together to bring new, good paying jobs into the Queen City. We now have a successful model, and I look forward to continue promoting Manchester’s pro-business environment.”

The New Hampshire Business Finance Authority understands the significance of BAE Systems to the state’s growing aerospace and defense industry, said Executive Director James Key Wallace.

“This partnership with BAE provides an exciting opportunity for Manchester and all of the communities supported by BAE’s significant presence in the state. Our innovative and collaborative approach to structuring this expansion shows that New Hampshire is able to attract world class companies who create high quality jobs,” he said.

Commissioner Caswell’s Statement on South Dakota v. Wayfair U.S. Supreme Court Decision

Thursday, June 21st, 2018

Commissioner Taylor Caswell’s statement on the South Dakota v. Wayfair decision handed down by the U.S. Supreme Court.

“The Wayfair decision handed down today by the United States Supreme Court tells New Hampshire businesses that they now must collect taxes for politicians in other states that they did not elect. This is unacceptable.

“New Hampshire businesses have never, ever, collected a sales tax and New Hampshire residents have never, ever, paid an income tax.  Imposing this new requirement on us isn’t just an administrative burden, it goes against what New Hampshire stands for:  Live Free or Die.

“The thousands of small businesses that drive our economy must not be forced to become tax collectors for other states. I am working with state leaders to determine a path forward aimed at defending New Hampshire’s business community from this modern-day taxation without representation scheme.”

Taylor Caswell
Commissioner
NH Department of Business and Economic Affairs

A New Approach to Economic Development in New Hampshire

Wednesday, June 20th, 2018

Commissioner Taylor Caswell 

Last year, Governor Sununu proposed the division of the Department of Resources and Economic Development, creating the Department of Business and Economic Affairs. Since its approval by the Legislature, this new agency has been a catalyst for increasing opportunities for New Hampshire to modernize and vastly improve the focus and practice of how we do economic development.

This couldn’t have happened at a better time. The practice of economic development has changed drastically over the past decade.  States and cities are moving away from the longstanding focus on government-run business recruitment and standard worker ‘unemployment training’ programs that gave little thought to what might come next for those workers.

What does this mean for New Hampshire?

It means we can hone in on the needs of our businesses here first, and leverage our business community with our state’s regional strengths to develop a compelling case for new businesses to come here.

It means we build new, more innovative strategies to recruit talent to our state.

It means connecting education and training directly to employers and jobs.

It means a new, more aggressive entry into the global marketplace to find opportunity for our small businesses seeking new markets.

It means refreshed, meaningful relationships with our state’s incredible network of public and private academic institutions, linking them with state policymakers and business leaders statewide.

It means working to update and increase the predictability of the state’s regulatory environment and use our small and agile government as a true advantage.

It means constructing new partnerships and collaborations across a broad universe of stakeholders to focus on building communities where people want to live and work and telling that story effectively and to as many people outside the state as we can.

New Hampshire’s economy is growing fast. Companies are expanding or moving here, and people are working.  In fact, in 2017, New Hampshire’s economy was the second fastest growing economy in the nation and our unemployment rate remains low.

My goal is to build this new system and create an economy that is resilient, vibrant, collaborative, intentional, and protects what we love best about New Hampshire.

The new Department of Business and Economic Affairs has the tools it needs to get there. We have the widely-respected Division of Travel & Tourism Development, which has a marketing team that is among the best in the nation and stokes the engine of New Hampshire’s crucial hospitality economy.  In 2017, its work helped generate 2.23 million visitor trips to New Hampshire, which yielded $5.5 billion in spending, maintaining 48,000 jobs, and generating $269 million in tax revenue for the state.

Our Division of Economic Development helps businesses connect to, and fund, job training; works with existing and new business leaders to finance and expand their economic footprint; guides companies seeking to access global markets or win government contracts, and helps drive our entrepreneurial economy.  Its work has direct impact on the profitability of our state’s employers and creates value for the state and residents.

The combined teams are creating new stakeholder collaborations, integrating marketing efforts and strategies, and working hard to establish New Hampshire as a leader in holistic, collaborative state economic development.

I look forward to working with you.

Taylor Caswell
Commissioner
New Hampshire Department of Business and Economic Affairs

Regenerative Manufacturing in Manchester Ready to Change the World

Monday, June 4th, 2018

Business and Economic Affairs Commissioner Taylor Caswell

When Governor Sununu signed SB 564 into law last week, he set New Hampshire on course to becoming the global hub for regenerative manufacturing.

The science behind creating new tissue and organs, and manufacturing them commercially, may sound like something from the 22nd century, but that technology is already happening at the Advanced Regenerative Manufacturing Institute in the Manchester Millyard.

The potential impact on New Hampshire economy, the healthcare industry, and people’s lives across the planet is nothing short of colossal.

Scientists, visionaries and legislators came together in Manchester this week for the signing of this bill because it is that important to our 21st century economy. This new law exempts for 10 years qualified companies locating their regenerative manufacturing business in New Hampshire from state corporate taxes. It also establishes a $5 million student loan forgiveness program for those people who come here to work in and grow this amazing industry. After five years, the state will pay for their student loans.


These are significant new tools that truly illustrate that New Hampshire is open for business. This legislation will help us recruit to our state, and retain, both businesses and the skilled workforce they need to grow and further evolve this science.


I can’t think of a more appropriate place for regenerative manufacturing to start changing the world than Manchester’s Millyard. A century ago, these very same buildings housed the largest and most technologically advanced textile mills on the planet. And now, here in 2018, these mills are on the precipice of once again being a globally critical manufacturing hub.

We’ve been here before. We can do it again.

Taylor Caswell
Commissioner
NH Business and Economic Affairs

Proposed Whitewater Park Poised to Transform Franklin Economy

Wednesday, November 8th, 2017

The old adage says that “a rising tide floats all boats.”

In the City of Franklin, it is more apt to say “whitewater floats a new economy.”

This week, community members gathered alongside the Winnipesaukee River downtown to celebrate a project described as “transformative” for this former mill city, as two significant grants push the Mill City Park closer to reality.

The project received a $180,000 grant from the U.S. Economic Development Administration and Franklin Savings Bank is donating $250,000.

There are about 280 whitewater parks across the country, but this one will be the first in New England. More than that, says developer Marty Parichand, it is a catalyst that for boosting the city’s economy, generating $6.8 million of direct spending in the region.

The river runs through the heart of downtown, which once fed mills turning out wool cloth, hacksaws and hosiery. Thrill seekers will head to the city to run the Class II, III and IV whitewater and entrepreneurs can catch the wave of the new economy on the rise.

Projects like Mill City Park, Commissioner Taylor Caswell, of the Department of Business and Economic Affairs, told those gathered in Trestle View Park, will draw more than visitors; it will draw visitors who turn into residents, drawn by the lifestyle and the opportunities in the Granite State.

“One of the biggest things for me is to be able to emphasize the fact that in New Hampshire, we have a community; we have recreation and we have quality of life for everybody,” he said. “In the big picture, it is absolutely crucial what you’re doing, not just for your community, but for the state as a whole, because that is what we are doing every day — telling the story of New Hampshire; telling the story of the quality of life and telling everyone how great it is here. This is one more piece we can put in our toolbox.”

Lorna Colquhoun
Communications Director
NH Division of Economic Development